Empirical Investigation of the Role of Emotional Intelligence on Employees’ Work Engagement in Banking Industry in South-western Nigeria


Empirical Investigation of the Role of Emotional Intelligence on Employees’ Work Engagement in Banking Industry in South-western Nigeria


Solomon Ojo Ph.d

Department of Human Resource Development, Faculty of Management Sciences, Okuku Campus, Osun State University.


International Journal of Industrial and Business ManagementThe study investigated the role of Emotional Intelligence on employees’ work Engagement in banking industry. A total 804 bank employees took part in the study, in which 364 (45.3%) were males while 440 (54.7%) were females, with a mean age of 33.38 yrs (SD=7.98yrs). Questionnaire format was employed for data collection, which was made into a number of sections and into several copies for data collection. Both the Descriptive and Inferential statistics were adopted for data analysis. Specifically, the Statistical Packages for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 17.0 was utilized for data analysis.
The results revealed that bank employees who were high on emotional intelligence reported more work engagement than bank employees who are low on emotional intelligence [t (802) =3.20, P<.05]. The result equally showed that bank employees who were found high on some measures of emotional intelligence reported more work engagement than bank employees who were low on some of the measures.
The results were discussed extensively in relation to relevant existing bodies of literature.


Keywords: Emotional intelligence, Work engagement, Banking Industry, Bank Employees, South-western Nigeria.

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How to cite this article:
Solomon Ojo. Empirical Investigation of the Role of Emotional Intelligence on Employees’ Work Engagement in Banking Industry in South-western Nigeria. International Journal of Industrial and Business Management, 2017; 1:1. DOI:10.28933/ijibm-2017-04-0101


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