Impact of Monetary Policy on Growth and Poverty: Drastic Consequences of Government Intervention


Impact of Monetary Policy on Growth and Poverty: Drastic Consequences of Government Intervention


Dr Ayub Mehar
Professor, Iqra University Karachi


Journal of Modern Economy

It is unfortunate that growing poverty and widening rich-poor gaps at the initial stage of globalization created several questions about the future of liberalization regime. The present world has been divided into two parts. The upcoming distribution is not geographical. Every region is silently being divided into masters and slavers. This study is mainly concerned with the role of monetary policy in determining the level of poverty in a country. It was concluded in this study that monetary expansion– either to finance the budget deficit or credit to private sector – will always lead the inflation. The increase in the supply of goods and services will be required to defuse the demand pull inflationary pressure. Consequently credit easing policies to boost the investment activities will be required. It indicates the complexities in intervention policies. One intervention requires further intervention to set off the side effects and tuning of the outcomes of policy measures. It was concluded in this study that a parallel qualitative easing is always required with the quantitative easing for tuning the rate of GDP growth, investment, inflation, unemployment and level of poverty.


Keywords: Quantitative Easing, Easy Access to Credit, Inflation, Growth in M2

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How to cite this article:
Ayub Mehar. Impact of Monetary Policy on Growth and Poverty: Drastic Consequences of Government Intervention. Journal of Modern Economy, 2018,1:1


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