Gender Differentials in Climate Change Adaptive Capabilities Among Small- scale Farmers in Abia State, Nigeria


Gender Differentials in Climate Change Adaptive Capabilities Among Small- scale Farmers in Abia State, Nigeria


Obinna, Leo. Oa.

aDepartment of Rural Sociology and Extension College of Agricultural Economics, Rural Sociology and Extension Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike


American Journal of Agricultural Research

Gender differentials in climate change adaptive capabilities among small- scale farmers in Abia State was assessed using a sample size of 70 male and 70 female respondents generated via a multi- stage method. Data collected from the respondents through the use of questionnaire and interview schedule were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Z – Test analysis. Results showed 46 years and 44 years as the mean ages of male and female respondents respectively. About 29 %, 43 % and 21 % of the male respondents and 50 %, 36 % and 11 % of the female respondents were into farming, trading and other professions respectively. About 86 % of the male respondents and 69 % of the female respondents were literates and had mean monthly income of ₦32,871.143 and ₦28,642. 854. Result equally, shows a mean farm size of 1.7 and 1.3 hectares for the male and female respondents with mean years of farming experience of 11 years and 12 years respectively. About 57 %, 14, 12 and 7 % of male respondents acquired their farm lands through inheritance, lease, communal ownership, and outright purchase respectively as against 7 %, 57 %, 7 % and 29 % for the female respondents. About 90 % of the male respondents had between once every 2 years and once every 6 months of extension contacts as against 82 % of the female respondents. Also 86 % of the male respondents belonged to social associations as against 93 % of the female respondents. Result further shows that a high proportion (X ≥ 50 %) of male and female respondents have high level of awareness on adaptive measures but negative (X< 2.5) and low practice (X< 2.5) level of adaptive measures on climate change. The study equally shows that there is a remarkable difference between the male respondents’ attitude and practice levels and that of female respondents’ in the study area. Therefore the study concludes that there is gender differentials in climate change adaptive capabilities among small- scale farmers in Abia State. Hence, the study showed differences both in attitude and practice levels between male and female respondents in adaptive measures against the effects of climate change in the study area. The study recommends that government agencies and other stakeholders in climate change issues should involve both male and female respondents equitably in order to find a sustainable and location specific adaptive measures against the negative effects of climate change mostly in the study area.


Keywords: Gender Differentials, Climate Change and Abia State.

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How to cite this article:
Obinna, Leo. Oa.. Gender Differentials in Climate Change Adaptive Capabilities Among Small- scale Farmers in Abia State, Nigeria. American Journal of Agricultural Research, 2019,4:54. DOI: 10.28933/ajar-2019-01-2205


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