American Journal of Agricultural Research


Anthocyanin contains in Cratoxylum formosum

Research Article of American Journal of Agricultural Research Anthocyanin contains in Cratoxylum formosum Theeranat Suwanaruang Environmental Science Program, Faculty of liberal arts and science, Kalasin University, Namon District, Kalasin Province, Thailand 46231 Cratoxylum formosum is an indigenous Thai vegetable, mostly grown in the North-East of Thailand., It has been reported that the leaf extract showed strongly antioxidant and antimutagenic properties when compared with 108 species of indigenous Thai plants. The point toward of this do research was analyzed anthocyanin inhibit in Cratoxylum formosum. The means was assessment in dissimilarity exaction solutions (water, acetone, ethanol and methanol) and divergence era (0 minutes, 30 minutes and 60 minutes). The scrutinize chemically was weighed samples 5 g with modification exaction solutions and divergence era afterward absorbance samples at 535 nm by spectrophotometer. The fallout create that at 0 minutes in diversity exaction solutions (water, acetone, ethanol and methanol) were 909.136±75.010, 737.743±734.871, 704.216±2.313and 825.006±14.226 mg/L respectively. At 30 minutes in modification exaction solutions (water, acetone, ethanol and methanol) were 873.886±8.626, 788.503±17.094, 720.98±30.786 and 758.686±37.772 mg/L correspondingly and to finish period at 60 minutes in divergence exaction solutions (water, acetone, ethanol and methanol) were 903.96±75, 764.53±49.984, 735.236±45.783 and 824.38±14.718 mg/L respectively. The highest anthocyanin in Cratoxylum formosumwas exaction with water at 0 minutes (909.136±75.010mg/L). Cratoxylum formosum is an local Thai vegetable, regularly developed in the North-East of Thailand., It has been reported that the sheet take out showed formidably anthocyanin properties Thai plants. Keywords: Anthocyanin, Cratoxylum formosum..and exaction solutions ...

Animal dung availability and their fertilizer values in a context of low soil fertility conditions for forage seed and crops production in Benin (West Africa)

Research Article of American Journal of Agricultural Research Animal dung availability and their fertilizer values in a context of low soil fertility conditions for forage seed and crops production in Benin (West Africa). Basile GBENOU1, Sébastien ADJOLOHOUN1*, Léonard AHOTON2, Daniel Bignon Maxime HOUNDJO1, Aliou SAÏDOU2, Marcel HOUINATO1, Brice Augustin SINSIN3 1Département de Production Animale, Faculté des Sciences Agronomiques, Université d’Abomey-Calavi, 03 BP 2819 Jéricho, Cotonou, Benin. 2Département de Production Végétale, Faculté des Sciences Agronomiques, Université d’Abomey-Calavi, 03 BP 2819 Jéricho, Cotonou, Benin. 3Département de l’Aménagement et Gestion des Ressources Naturelles, Faculté des Sciences Agronomiques, Université d’Abomey-Calavi, 03 BP 2819 Jéricho, Cotonou, Benin. Livestock manure, feed biomass fed to animals that pass through digestive tract undigested and urine excreted from subsequent tissue metabolism, is conventionally termed as wastes. To optimize the use of animal manure for the purpose of agronomic processing or valorization, it is essential to know its availability and plant nutrients composition. The use of reference values ​​is a quick method of estimation. However, books on farm fertilizers generally offer only an average value that is not representative of the diversity of situations. The aim of this study was to (1) estimate the quantity of manures from cattle, sheep, goats, pigs and poultry, (2) determine the physico-chemical characteristics and plant nutrient contents of these droppings and (3) identify the inter-relationships between the physical characteristics (pH, EC and dry matter(DM)) and the most essential macronutrients (N, P and K). A total of 30 animal groups (herds or flocks) were survived per species and a total of 30 samples were collected over twelve months (January 1st to December 31, 2016) for DM, pH, electrical conductibility, nitrogen, phosphorous, potassium, calcium, magnesium and sodium contents for each sample.  According to animal population of the country, the results of the study showed that, an amount ...

Influence of cow manure and row spacing on growth, flowering and seed yield of Centro (Centrosema pubescens Benth.) on ferralitic soils of Benin (West Africa)

Research Article of American Journal of Agricultural Research Influence of cow manure and row spacing on growth, flowering and seed yield of Centro (Centrosema pubescens Benth.) on ferralitic soils of Benin (West Africa) Daniel Bignon Maxime HOUNDJO1, Sébastien ADJOLOHOUN1*, Léonard AHOTON2, Basile GBENOU1, Aliou SAIDOU2, Marcel HOUINATO1, Brice Augustin SINSIN3 1Département de Production Animale, Faculté des Sciences Agronomiques, Université d’Abomey-Calavi, 03 BP 2819 Jéricho, Cotonou, Benin. 2Département de Production Végétale, Faculté des Sciences Agronomiques, Université d’Abomey-Calavi, 03 BP 2819 Jéricho, Cotonou, Benin. 3Département de l’Aménagement et Gestion des Ressources Naturelles, Faculté des Sciences Agronomiques, Université d’Abomey-Calavi, 03 BP 2819 Jéricho, Cotonou, Benin. Centrosema pubescens (Benth) is identified as a tropical forage legume of considerable promise which can improve pasture in West Africa. A study on the influence of rates of cattle manure in combination with plant row spacing on the growth, phenology and seed yield of Centro (Centrosema pubescens) was conducted at the Teaching and Research Farm of the Faculty of Agronomy Science of University of Abomey-Calavi in South Benin. The site is located at latitude 6° 30’ N and longitude 2° 40’ E with elevation of 50 m above sea level. The area is characterized by ferralitic soils with low fertility, rainfall range of 1200 mm with relative humidity from 40 to 95 % and means annual temperature varying between 25 and 26 °C. Field experiments were conducted during 2014, 2015 and 2016 seasons. Five cattle manure rates (0, 4 tons, 8 tons, 12 tons and 16 tons/ha) and 40 kg P2O5/ha in combination with three plant spacings (40cm x 40cm, 80cm x 80cm, 120cm x 120cm) were evaluated in a 6x3 factorial laid out in Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD). Each treatment was replicated 4 times. The growth and flowering characteristics measured in the field included number of branches ...

Influence of Contamination of Soil With Heavy Metal on the Growth of Three Herbaceous Plant Species

Research Article of American Journal of Agricultural Research Influence of Contamination of Soil With Heavy Metal on the Growth of Three Herbaceous Plant Species 1C.E., Igwe, 2J.N., Azorji and 2S.K., Iheagwam 1Department of Forestry and Environmental Management, Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike, Nigeria 2Department of Biological Sciences, Hezekiah University, Umudi, P.M.B 3002 Ishiala Umudi, Imo State, Nigeria. Contemporary literatures are awash with Heavy metal contamination in soils as a source of global environmental concern. Cultivation of crops on these contaminated soils may result in accumulation of heavy metals resulting in possible risks on human health. For this reason, a pot experiment was conducted between May and August 2016 at the green house of the Department of Forestry and Environmental Management, Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike. The experiment was specifically aimed at evaluating the influence of kaoline mined soil samples on the growth of three herbaceous plant species (Chromolaena odorata, Ipomoea involucrata and Mariscus alternifolius) commonly found at abandoned kaolin mining site at Ohiya in Umuahia South East, Nigeria. The experiment was laid out in a Randomized Complete Block Design with Six (6) replicates. Data were collected on Plant height, Number of leaves, fresh and dry weight. Data were analyzed using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). Mean separations were done using Fisher LSD at 0.05% probability. Two mean values were subjected to studentized-t-test using statistical analytical system (SAS) software, version 8.0. The result showed that the kaolin mined soil sample significantly affected all the growth parameters measured during the study. Keywords: Soil, Heavy metals, herbaceous plants ...

Assessing the Methods in Identifying Rural Food Deserts: A Quantitative Systematic Review

Research Article of American Journal of Agricultural Research Assessing the Methods in Identifying Rural Food Deserts: A Quantitative Systematic Review Amirmohsen Behjat1, Aleck Ostry2, Christina Miewald 3 and Bernie Pauly4 1Assistant Professor in Healthcare Studies, Husson University, United States. 2Canada Research Chair in the Social Determinants of Health, Professor, Department of   Geography, University of Victoria, Canada. 3Adjunct Professor, Department of Geography, Simon Fraser University, Canada and Adjunct Professor, Department of Geography, University of Victoria, Canada. 4Associate Professor and Associate Director, School of Nursing, University of Victoria, Canada. It has been around two decades that the food desert concept was introduced to assess the geographic accessibility of healthy food stores in deprived urban and rural communities. Despite the contribution of this strong tool in evaluating food insecurity, the methodological aspects especially in rural areas have been less discussed in the literature. The aim of this study is to explore and compare different methodologies in identifying rural food deserts based on the related major elements. A systematic review was conducted on published English language studies that used quantitative methods to identify rural food deserts up to December 2015. Twenty studies met the criteria and were included in this study. The results from these studies indicated the four major key elements (food availability, geographic accessibility, deprivation indicator(s), and geographic unit of analysis) were used and quantified by researchers in their methodology to identify rural food deserts. We also found out that measuring food deserts involves a high degree of sensitivity, as any changes in quantifying the elements may significantly impact the final results. Thus, the advantages and disadvantages of quantifying each element is discussed in a greater detail in this study. This will help researchers to develop a better food desert methodology which produce more comprehensive and accurate results in future. Keywords: Rural Food deserts, ...

Dr. Ajai Kumar Srivastav
Emeritus Professor, Department of Zoology, D.D.U. Gorakhpur University

Dr. Osman Tiryaki
Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University, Faculty of Agriculture, Plant Protection Department, Terzioglu Campus, 17020, ÇANAKKALE, TURKEY

Prof.Dr. Süleyman Taban
Professor, Department of Soil Science and Plant Nutrition, Ankara University, Ankara-TURKEY

Dr. Nikolay Dimitrov Panayotov
Professor & Head, Department of Horticulture, Agricultural University

Dr.  Samuel Ohikhena Agele 
Lecture/Researcher, Department of Crop, Soil & Pest Management, Federal University of Technology

Dr. Ghousia Begum
Principal Scientist, Toxicology Unit, Biology Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Chemical Technology

Dr. Sirisha Adamala
Assistant Professor, Department of Applied Engineering, Vignan's University

Dr. Mala Trivedi
Professor, Amity Institute of Biotechnology, AUUP, Lucknow-226028

Dr Ambreesh Singh Yadav
Scientific Officer, U.P. Council of Agricultural Research, Lucknow, U.P., India

Dr. Abd El-Aleem Saad Soliman Desoky
Professor, Plant Protection Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Sohag University

Dr. Chang-Hong Liu
Professor, School of life sciences, Nanjing University, P.R. China

Dr. İrfan Özberk
Professor & Head, Dept. of Field Crops, Fac. of Agri, The Univ. of Harran, Sanliurfa, Turkey

Dr. Papadakis Ioannis
Assistant Professor, Laboratory of Pomology, Agricultural University of Athens

Dr. KAPTAIN KISHOR BAJPAYEE
Associate Professor & Head, Center for Research in Ethno & Medico Botany Dr. R.M.L. PG. College ( C.S.J.M. UNIVERSITY)

Dr. Ayman EL Sabagh
Assistant professor, agronomy department, faculty of agriculture, kafresheikh university, Egypt; Visiting scientist at Field Crops Department ,Faculty of Agriculture , Cukurova University, Turkey

Dr. Alaa Jabbar Abd Al-Manhel
Assistant Professor, Agriculture college /Basra University

Dr. Bibhuti Bhusan Sahoo
Scientist, Regional Research & Technology Transfer Station, (OUAT), Semiliguda

Dr. Sedat Karadavut
Assistant Professor, Agricultural Structers and İrrigation (Biosystems Engineering), Trakya University/TURKEY

Dr. Abhishek Naik
Area Manager, Technology development department

Dr. Ionel BONDOC
Associate Professor, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Iasi, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine Iasi (ROMANIA), Department of Public Health

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1. Avinaba Mukherjee, Sourav Sikdar, Anisur Rahman Khuda-Bukhsh. Evaluation of ameliorative potential of isolated flavonol fractions from Thuja occidentalis in lung cancer cells and in Benzo(a) pyrene induced lung toxicity in mice. International Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine, 2016; 1(1): 0001-0013. 
2. Vikas Gupta, Parveen Bansal, Junaid Niazi, Kamlesh Kohli, Pankaj Ghaiye. Anti-anxiety Activity of Citrus paradisi var. duncan Extracts in Swiss Albino Mice-A Preclinical Study. Journal of Herbal Medicine Research, 2016; 1(1): 0001-0006.

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American Journal of Agricultural Research

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