American Journal of Agricultural Research


Effect of storage condition on seed quality and health in jute O-9897

Research Article of American Journal of Agricultural Research Effect of storage condition on seed quality and health in jute O-9897 S. M. A. Haque1*, I. Hossain2 and M. A. R. Khokon2 1. Senior Scientific Officer, Plant Pathology Department, Pest Management Division, Bangladesh Jute Research Institute, Dhaka-1207, 2. Professor, Department of Plant Pathology, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh. The experiments were conducted in the laboratory of Plant Pathology Department, Bangladesh Jute Research Institute. The experiments were conducted during the period 15 January 2010 to 5 March 2012. Nine different types of containers viz. tin pot, plastic pot, poly bag, gunny bag, gunny bag lined with polythene, earthen pot, cloth bag, brown paper and IRRI poly bag, two level of moisture contents viz. farmers’ condition (13%) and recommended moisture condition (9.5%) by Bangladesh Gazette (2010) and seed treatment with Provax-200 and control (untreated) were used for the present study. Seeds were stored for 12 months and examined after 4. 8 and 12 months of storage. Among the nine containers, tin pot was found better in respect of moisture content, germination, mean germination time, vigour index and 1000- seed weight. Health condition of seeds was also superior compared to other containers. The poorest performance was observed in earthen pot regarding moisture content, germination, mean germination time, vigour index, 1000- seed weight and seed borne infection. The findings of the present study also reveal that recommended moisture content was better than farmers’ condition. Provax-200 treated seed also resulted better performance than non treated seed. So, Quality of jute seeds can be maintained by storage in tin pot with provax-200 treated and recommendation moisture content (9.5%). Keywords: Effect, storage container, seed quality and health ...

Integrated weed (Orobanche crenata) management on faba bean

Research Article of American Journal of Agricultural Research Integrated weed (Orobanche crenata) management on faba bean Mekonnen Misganaw Sirinka Agricultural Research Center, North Wollo, Ethiopia In Ethiopia pulse crops are widely grown and Faba bean (Vicia faba L., 2n=12) is an old world grain legume of the family Leguminasae. This crop is one of the major pulses grown in the highlands of Ethiopia ranging from 1800-3000 m.a.s.l receiving an annual rainfall of 700-1100 mm, and the country is now considered as one of the secondary centers of genetic diversity. In eastern Amhara region high lands, faba bean is cultivated widely and thought to be an area for the largest collection of faba bean landraces. The production of faba bean is declined from year to year due to various production constraints such as diseases, soil acidity and weeds, particularly root parasitic weeds Broomrape (Orobanche species). These parasitic weeds cause very high levels of crop damage in terms of both yield and quality. Yield losses due to Orobanche weed ranges from 5 to 100% depending on the level of infestation and environmental conditions. Orobanche species are root parasitic flowering plants lack of leaves and totally dependent on their hosts for their life cycle. The parasitic is on a wide range of food legumes such as faba bean, field pea, lentil, vetch, Solanaceae crops, oil crops and root crops. The severe invasion of legume crops, especially faba bean and field pea are by Orobanche crenata. The physical attachment and the damage of the weed are under ground. The weed disperses by wind, flood, birds, animals, crop seeds, humans and farm machinery. It is propagated by seeds which can remain dormant and survive and able to viable in the soil for more than 20 years. Due to the complete devastation of faba bean by Orobanche crenata, ...

Organoleptic Properties And Proximate Composition Of Some Potato Genotypes

Research Article of American Journal of Agricultural Research Organoleptic Properties And Proximate Composition Of Some Orange-fleshed Sweet Potato Genotypes Kelechukwu, E. C.1; Onu, O. O.2 and Ojimelukwe, P. C.3 1 National Root Crops Research Institute, Umudike Nigeria 2 Department of Agricultural and Bioresources Engineering, Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike, Nigeria 3 Department of Food Science and Technology, Michael Okpara University of Agriculture, Umudike, Nigeria The outstanding features of Orange-fleshed sweet potatoes (OFSP) are the nutritional and sensory versatility in terms of its micronutrient contents and wide range of colours, taste and mouth feel. This study was carried out to evaluate the organoleptic properties and proximate composition of some Orange-fleshed sweet potato genotypes viz: Umuspo1, Umuspo3 and Ex-Igbariam. Estimation of moisture, ash, crude fibre, fat, protein and energy value was conducted using standard AOAC procedures. Twenty-eight sensory assessors were used to evaluate some sensory (organoleptic) attributes such as colour, aroma, taste, mouth feel and general acceptability of chips and shake made from the OFSP genotypes. Proximate analysis result showed that moisture content varied from 68.137 - 61.235%, 4.23 - 5.54% for protein, 0.542 - 1.265% for fat, 1.22 -2.25% for crude fibre, and 1.189 - 1.677 % for ash. The energy value ranged from 392.906 %- Umuspo1 to 390.74%-Ex-Igbariam. % moisture content and dry matter differed significantly with varieties (P < 0.05). The highest values of vitamin C, B3 and B2 were 24.03 mg/g (Umuspo3), 0.324 mg/g (Umuspo3) and 0.028 mg/g (Ex-Igbariam), respectively. The experimental OFSP genotypes had higher value of calcium than the other mineral content. Chips and shake prepared from the experimental OFSP genotypes were generally accepted for consumption and could serve for use as chips and shake. Keywords: Orange-fleshed Sweetpotato, Proximate Composition, Energy Value, Organoleptic Properties ...

Behavior of improved varieties and creoles of rice at the Baixada Maranhense

Research Article of American Journal of Agricultural Research Behavior of improved varieties and creoles of rice (Oryza sativa L.) at the Baixada Maranhense Ivaneide de Oliveira Nascimento1*, Antônia Alice Costa Rodrigues1, Raimunda Nonata Santos de Lemos1, Maria Rosangela Malheiros Silva1, Francisco de Assis dos Santos Diniz1, Leonardo de Jesus Machado Gois de Oliveira1 and Erlen Keila Cândido e Silva1  1 Post-Graduation Program of Agroecology, Maranhão State of University, Campus São Luís, São Luís, Maranhão State, Brazil. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of the different varieties of creole and improved seeds of rice regarding the productive aspects and disease resistance in the experimental field of the Farm School of São Benedito and in area of farmer in Arari -MA. It was used improved seeds of rice (Primavera, Emeralds, Sertaneja, BR Irga 420, Serra Dourada, Arariba), and creoles (Palha Murcha, Rice Vermelho and Come Cru), which constituted the treatments in a randomized block design with four replications, plots of 10 m2 useful area of 2.70 m2. In the aspect of grain yield, the creole varieties Palha Murcha and Rice Vermelho presented respectively mean grain yield (x= 1.472 kg ha-1; x=1.374 kg ha-1), within the average expected for Maranhão and equal to the variety improved Arariba, in the municipality of Arari. In São Bento, the varieties Palha Murcha, BR Irga 420, Arariba, Sertaneja, Esmeralda and Primavera produced above average (1.580 kg ha-1) for Maranhão. As for the resistance to diseases, all varieties were moderately resistant to diseases brown spot and Grains spots. The varieties Primavera, Esmeralda, Sertaneja, BR Irga 420, Serra Dourada, Arariba and Palha Murcha had a high susceptibility to leaf scald in São Bento. There was incidence of narrow spot at the improved varieties Arariba and Br Irga 420, with behavior moderately resistant, the other varieties were resistant to this disease in Arari. Therefore, ...

Impacts of climate change on crop production and its adaptation

Review Article of American Journal of Agricultural Research A Review on Impacts of Climate Change on Crop Production and its Adaptation in Sub-Saharan Africa Margaret Njeri Mwangi Department of Agricultural Economics and Agribusiness Management, Egerton University, P.O. Box, 536-20115, Egerton, Kenya Climate change, which is inevitable, has a large impact on economies and livelihoods of many people. Therefore, the need to mitigate its impacts is paramount. Consequently, this has motivated a substantial body of research on the matter. The central issues that have been addressed are the impacts of climate change as well as the adaptation strategies that can be employed. The aim of this paper is to review existing literature on the above issues with a focus on smallholder farmers in sub-Saharan Africa. Adaptation strategies identified include; adjustment in land use, change in technology, farm diversification and risk management. Some environmental, economic and institutional factors are revealed to hinder farmers from adopting these strategies. The study recommends emphasizes on polices enhancing adaptation by smallholder farmers. Additionally, future studies on climate change should widen the range of variables used so as to capture the current global food prices and adaptation transition costs. Keywords: Climate change; adaptation; smallholder farmers; Ricardian model ...

Dr. Ajai Kumar Srivastav
Emeritus Professor, Department of Zoology, D.D.U. Gorakhpur University

Dr. Osman Tiryaki
Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University, Faculty of Agriculture, Plant Protection Department, Terzioglu Campus, 17020, ÇANAKKALE, TURKEY

Prof.Dr. Süleyman Taban
Professor, Department of Soil Science and Plant Nutrition, Ankara University, Ankara-TURKEY

Dr. Nikolay Dimitrov Panayotov
Professor & Head, Department of Horticulture, Agricultural University

Dr.  Samuel Ohikhena Agele 
Lecture/Researcher, Department of Crop, Soil & Pest Management, Federal University of Technology

Dr. Ghousia Begum
Principal Scientist, Toxicology Unit, Biology Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Chemical Technology

Dr. Sirisha Adamala
Assistant Professor, Department of Applied Engineering, Vignan's University

Dr. Mala Trivedi
Professor, Amity Institute of Biotechnology, AUUP, Lucknow-226028

Dr Ambreesh Singh Yadav
Scientific Officer, U.P. Council of Agricultural Research, Lucknow, U.P., India

Dr. Abd El-Aleem Saad Soliman Desoky
Professor, Plant Protection Department, Faculty of Agriculture, Sohag University

Dr. Chang-Hong Liu
Professor, School of life sciences, Nanjing University, P.R. China

Dr. İrfan Özberk
Professor & Head, Dept. of Field Crops, Fac. of Agri, The Univ. of Harran, Sanliurfa, Turkey

Dr. Papadakis Ioannis
Assistant Professor, Laboratory of Pomology, Agricultural University of Athens

Dr. KAPTAIN KISHOR BAJPAYEE
Associate Professor & Head, Center for Research in Ethno & Medico Botany Dr. R.M.L. PG. College ( C.S.J.M. UNIVERSITY)

Dr. Ayman EL Sabagh
Assistant professor, agronomy department, faculty of agriculture, kafresheikh university, Egypt; Visiting scientist at Field Crops Department ,Faculty of Agriculture , Cukurova University, Turkey

Dr. Alaa Jabbar Abd Al-Manhel
Assistant Professor, Agriculture college /Basra University

Dr. Bibhuti Bhusan Sahoo
Scientist, Regional Research & Technology Transfer Station, (OUAT), Semiliguda

Dr. Sedat Karadavut
Assistant Professor, Agricultural Structers and İrrigation (Biosystems Engineering), Trakya University/TURKEY

Dr. Abhishek Naik
Area Manager, Technology development department

Dr. Ionel BONDOC
Associate Professor, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Iasi, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine Iasi (ROMANIA), Department of Public Health

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American Journal of Agricultural Research

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