CANNABINOID POISONING IN CHILDREN: IMPORTANCE OF MULTIDRUG TESTING


CANNABINOID POISONING IN CHILDREN: IMPORTANCE OF MULTIDRUG TESTING


Waleska Ramos Souza¹ *, Cinthya Maria Pereira²

UNIFACISA¹, Teacher Dra of the Pharmacy Course UNIFACISA²


International Journal of Addiction Research and Therapy

Introduction: Cannabis sativa is one of the most commonly used recreational drugs, contains over 500 different clinical compounds and over 60 known cannabinoids. Drug abuse tests are widely used as hospital screening tests for poisoning diagnoses. Objective: This study aims to understand the types of drug abuse tests used in cases of acute cannabinoid poisoning, especially in children.

Methodology: This was a literature review, having as source of research the databases UpToDate, NCBI Pubmed, Online Library (SCIELO) and Toxicology Manuals. As inclusion criteria were used publications from 2000 to 2019, in Portuguese, English and Spanish, related to the keywords.

Discussion: Acute cannabis poisoning is a clinical diagnosis, however, diagnosis in children may be difficult, so drug screening in the urine may be helpful to confirm the diagnosis.

Conclusion: These tests are easy to perform and cheap, having good specificity through their chemical structure, directing the immunoassay to the toxic agent.


Keywords: cannabis sativa, accidents, toxic agent.

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How to cite this article:
Waleska Ramos Souza, Cinthya Maria Pereira. CANNABINOID POISONING IN CHILDREN: IMPORTANCE OF MULTIDRUG TESTING. International Journal of Addiction Research and Therapy, 2020, 3:14. DOI: 10.28933/ijart-2020-01-2009


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