Disaster management strategy for avoiding the future losses by a slope failure at Nanhuan road, Fuxin area, Northeast China


Disaster management strategy for avoiding the future losses by a slope failure at Nanhuan road, Fuxin area, Northeast China


Kaleem Ullah Jan Khan1, Changming Wang1*, Zhu Liang1, Lixin Zhang2

1College of Construction Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130021, P.R China.
2Liaoning Traffic Planning and Design Institute, Shenyang 110005, China


international Journal of Natural Science1

Many surrounding areas in the vicinity of failed slope at Nanhuan road, Fuxin area, Northeast China are witnessed as the signs of disaster. The observed settlement as wastage of an active mass in the area has been observed after the excessive precipitation in 2012 (May to October) which caused infrastructural damages (Roads at the top and bottom of the failure zone), agricultural fields and residential areas. Therefore, the paper proposes examining this subject. An extensive field investigation was conducted in the area of Fuxin, west of Liaoning province China. It is recommended and suggested that a series of disaster prevention and both structural and non-structural mitigation measures with the involvement of government and local community are required, to be prepared in advance for avoiding the future economic loss as well as the impending disaster in the area. This paper also highlights the need of investigation in response mechanism and forward planning for awareness initiatives: to avoid the future hazard in the remotest failure zones of Fuxin area, Northeast China.


Keywords: Landslides; Fuxin; Disaster; Management strategy

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How to cite this article:
Kaleem Ullah Jan Kha, Changming Wang, Zhu Liang, Lixin Zhang. Disaster management strategy for avoiding the future losses by a slope failure at Nanhuan road, Fuxin area, Northeast China. International Journal of Natural Science and Reviews, 2020; 5:15. DOI: 10.28933/ijnsr-2020-08-1905


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