Acute renal attack after treatment with Carapa Procera oil: two cases at the Ziguinchor Peace Hospital (Senegal West Africa) and review of the literature


Acute renal attack after treatment with Carapa Procera oil: two cases at the Ziguinchor Peace Hospital (Senegal West Africa) and review of the literature


KANE Yaya1*, SECK Sidy Mohamed3, BA AW Mamadou2, DIAWARA Mame Selly4, LEMRABOTT A T2,  FAYE Maria2, FAYE Moustapha2, CISSE M Moustapha4, KA El Fary2, NIANG Abdou2, DIOUF Boucar2

1Nephrology Hemodialysis Service, Peace Hospital Assane Seck University of Ziguinchor; 2HALD UCAD Dakar hemodialysis nephrology service;3St Louis UGB CHR hemodialysis nephrology service;4CHR hemodialysis nephrology department of Thiès / University of Thiès


International Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine

We describe two cases of impaired secondary renal function to a Carapa Procera taking as part of traditional treatment in Ziguinchor, southern Senegal. The certain or suspected toxicity of Carapa Procera is little known in the literature. In the two reported observations, no cause but the traditional treatment was found to explain the clinical picture presented. The development was favorable in all cases after medical treatment and a few hemodialysis sessions. we insist on the difficult context of investigation of these accidents, on the medical ignorance of these practices in sub-Saharan Africa and in Senegal in particular, as well as on the necessary collaboration with local botanists knowledgeable in traditional medicine.


Keywords: Carapa procera, Kidney attack, Casamance.

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How to cite this article:
KANE Yaya, SECK Sidy Mohamed, BA AW Mamadou, DIAWARA Mame Selly, LEMRABOTT A T, FAYE Maria, FAYE Moustapha, CISSE M Moustapha, KA El Fary, NIANG Abdou, DIOUF Boucar.Acute renal attack after treatment with Carapa Procera oil: two cases at the Ziguinchor Peace Hospital (Senegal West Africa) and review of the literature.International Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine 2020, 5:26. DOI:10.28933/ijtcm-2019-12-1805 (This article has been retracted from International Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine. Please do not use it for any purposes.)


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