International Journal of Hospital Pharmacy


PHARMACEUTICAL PROFESSIONAL PERFORMANCE IN PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

Review Article of International Journal of Hospital Pharmacy PHARMACEUTICAL PROFESSIONAL PERFORMANCE IN PRIMARY HEALTH CARE Ortência Kelly Jacinto Rodrigues1, Adna Maria Tavares1, Cinthya Maria Pereira de Souza2 1Pharmacy student UNIFACISA; 2Mentor teacher UNIFACISA. Introduction: The pharmacist’s role in pharmaceutical care occurs especially in two axes: medication management and pharmaceutical care. Direct patient care is a challenge for the Brazilian health system, as this context provokes the construction of a new professional identity of the pharmacist: the clinic. Objective: To analyze a current panorama of the role of pharmaceutical professionals in primary health care. Methodology: This was a descriptive and exploratory literature review study with a qualitative approach. The descriptors “primary care”, “pharmacist” and “pharmaceutical care” were used, searched in an integrated way in the Scielo and Medline database. Results: The pharmacist still has a relevant role in management, but increasingly the system encourages the pharmacist to a more inclusive approach to patient care. There is consensus among the authors that the low number of pharmacists in primary care, coupled with the lack of perception of these professionals as part of the team and the lack of clarity about their attributions, contribute to the lack of recognition of this professional in the field of clinical practice. Conclusion: The incorporation of pharmaceutical clinical services has been shown to be an important strategy for resignification of the pharmacist in primary care. Actions involving clinical services need to be developed more frequently, so that the patient care bias is as explicit as the bureaucratic bias of pharmaceutical care. Keywords: Clinical Pharmacist, Primary Care, Pharmaceutical Care ...

Nimesulide-induced Fixed Drug Eruption

Research Article of International Journal of Hospital Pharmacy Nimesulide-induced Fixed Drug Eruption T.V.Harsha Varun and R.E.Ugandhar Santhiram College of Pharmacy, Nandyal, Kurnool Dt, Andhra Pradesh Nimesulide is a cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor with a high degree of selectivity to COX-2. Nimesulide is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent with antipyretic and analgesic properties. It is being commonly prescribed in India.[1] Some of the side effects reported with its use are Pruritus, urticaria, purpura, maculopapular rash and localized toxic pustuloderma.[2],[3] Due to severe hepatotoxicity and hemolytic anemia associated with its use, Nimesulide is likely to be withdrawn from the market in many countries. Case report: The authors report a case of a patient with a history of antihistamine hypersensitivity that developed a bullous form of pigmented fixed drug eruption after Nimesulide. Patch tests performed on residual skin lesion were positive to Nimesulide, confirming that this was the culprit drug. Keywords: Drug eruption, Fixed drug eruption, Lesion patch testing, Nimesulide, Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ...

A Comprehensive Review of Clinical Pharmacists in Chronic Care Management

Review Article of International Journal of Hospital Pharmacy A Comprehensive Review of Clinical Pharmacists in Chronic Care Management Abdul Kader Mohiuddin Dr. M. Nasirullah Memorial Trust, Tejgaon, Dhaka Pharmacy practice has changed substantially in recent years. The professionals have the opportunity to contribute directly to patient care in order to reduce morbimortality related to medication use, promoting health and preventing diseases. Healthcare organizations worldwide are under substantial pressure from increasing patient demand. Unfortunately, a cure is not always possible particularly in this era of chronic diseases, and the role of physicians has become limited to controlling and palliating symptoms. The increasing population of patients with long-term conditions are associated with high levels of morbidity, healthcare costs and GP workloads. Clinical pharmacy took over an aspect of medical care that had been partially abandoned by physicians. Overburdened by patient loads and the explosion of new drugs, physicians turned to pharmacists more and more for drug information, especially within institutional settings. Once relegated to counting and pouring, pharmacists headed institutional reviews of drug utilization and served as consultants to all types of health-care facilities. In addition, when clinical pharmacists are active members of the care team, they enhance efficiency by: Providing critical input on medication use and dosing. Working with patients to solve problems with their medications and improve adherence. Keywords: Chronic care; pharmacy intervention; diabetes care; CVD prevention; inflammatory bowel disease ...

Union Therapy- a Weapon Against Covid 19

Review Article of International Journal of Hospital Pharmacy Union Therapy- a Weapon Against Covid 19 Kanishk Kala1, Rupinder Kaur Sodhi2 1Research Scholar, Pharmacy, Chandigarh College of Pharmacy IK Gujral PTU, 2Guide, Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy IK Gujral PTU Illness and diseases has inflicted humans since ancient times through the course of development1.They emerged in Africa and initially were hunters and gatherers who learned many things from nature in terms of food shelter medicine and living. The nomadic life led to higher mortalities to them hence as a fact they started worshiping the forces of nature like sun water etc.2-4. With advancement of time and through wisdom acquired from the observations and knowledge through peer’s ancestors they stared farming and as a fact started to live in settled communities near river banks or water source. The role of their ancestors in shaping their customs and beliefs led to allot them the space of deities or as a connection link between deities. This settlement led the foundation of religions and development of civilizations. The civilizations holds their customs and beliefs which were centered over the idea of a supreme deity or supernatural power which governs all and prayers were offered to them for solutions of issues which were regarded as wrath of the God. Even sacrifices included with norms were also conducted in different cultures. In some instances body organ images were dedicated to Gods for treatment. and different deities were worship for safeguarding health. Traditional knowledge of medicines in different cultures also witnessed a transition from oral transmission to documented texts to development and integration with modern science. During course of time there has been many instances of integration which correlates with similarities irrespective of their individual inherent uniqueness in the various medical systems followed like links between Ayurveda and Sidhha, ...


Editor-in-chief: 
Dr. Fadi Alkhateeb Professor

Vice Editor-in-Chief:
Dr. Saurabh Gupta Professor and Head

Editors

Dr. Mohammed A. Islam
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Coast University School of Pharmacy, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Dr. Juseop Kang
Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacology Laboratory, College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791, South Korea.

Dr. Mohamed Azmi Hassali
Professor of Social and Administrative Pharmacy, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang, Malaysia.

Dr. Apollo James
Department of Pharmacy Practice, Nandha college of Pharmacy, Erode, Tamilnadu, India.

Dr. Iftikhar Ali
Department of Pharmacy, Northwest General Hospital and Research Center, Department of Pharmacy, University of Swabi, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa , Pakistan.

Dr Anthony David Hall
School of Clinical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Brisbane, Australia.

Dr Bhanukumar M
Department of General Medicine, JSS Hospital & Medical College, JSS University, Mysore, India.

Dr. Sandeep Kumar Kar
Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education & Research, India.

Dr. Biswaranjan Paital
Department of Zoology, Orissa University of Agriculture and Technology, College of Basic Science and Humanities, Bhubaneswar-751003, Odisha, India.

Dr. Vasiliki E. Kalodimou
Director at Flow Cytometry-Research & Regenerative Medicine Department, Athens, Greece.

Dr. Hale Z. Toklu
Department of Pharmacology & Therapeutics, University of Florida College of Medicine, 32610 Gainesville, FL, USA.

Dr. Fahad Saleem
Discipline of Social and Administrative Pharmacy, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Universiti Sains, Malaysia, Minden 11800, Penang, Malaysia

Dr. Ahamada Safna Mariyam.M
Dept of Pharmacy Practice, Acharya & B.M Reddy College of Pharmacy, Bangalore-107, India.

Dr. Ghada Ismail El Shahat Ali Attia
Literature of Pharmacognosy, Departments of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy, TANTA University- Egypt

Dr. Tauqeer Hussain Mallhi
School Of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Usm, Penang, Malaysia

Dr. Burton M. Altura

Physiology and Pharmacology Department, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, NY, USA.

Dr.  Yousif Abdu Asiri
Vice – Rector for Planning and Development, Professor of Clinical Pharmacy, King Saud University,, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia.

Dr. Amit K. Tiwari
Department of Pharmacology & Experimental Therapeutics, The University of Toledo – Health Science Campus, Toledo, OH, USA.

Dr. Saurabh Gupta
Professor and Head, Department of Pharmacology, Indore Institute of Pharmacy, Indore (M.P.), India, Principal Co-ordinator Scientist for outsources projects of industry, Indore institute of Pharmacy, Indore (M.P.), India, Scientist Co-ordinator member of Institutional Animal Ethical Committee, Indore institute of Pharmacy, Indore.

Dr. Tyler Madere
University of North Texas System College of Pharmacy –Department of Pharmacotherapy, Fort Worth, TX,USA.

Dr. Xianquan Zhan
Professor and Deputy Director, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, P.R. China

Dr. Fatima Suleman
Head of Discipline of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Health Sciences, College of Health Sciences of University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa.

Dr. Mohamed Eddouks
Faculty of Sciences and Techniques Errachidia, Moulay Ismail University, Meknes, Morocco.

Dr.  Syed A. A. Rizvi 
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Health Professions Division, Nova Southeastern University, FL, USA.

Dr. Carmela Saturnino 
Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, SA, ITALY.

Dr. Taha Nazir
University of Sargodha, Sargodha 40100, Pakistan.

Dr. Fadi Alkhateeb
Pharmacy Administration, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Irma Lerma Rangel College of Pharmacy, Texas A&M Health Science Center, Kingsville, Texas, USA.

Dr. Madhan Ramesh
Professor & Head, Department of Pharmacy Practice, JSS College of Pharmacy, JSS University, S S Nagar, Mysore.

Sushanta Kr. Das.
M. Pharm (Pharmacy Practice), Associate Professor and Pharm D Coordinator, CMR College of Pharmacy, Hyderabad

Dr. Mario Bernardo-Filho
Professor Titular, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro

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References: References should be listed in a numbered citation order at the end of the manuscript. DOIs and links to referenced articles should be added if available. Abstracts and talks for conferences or papers not yet accepted should not be cited. Examples Published Papers: 

1.Kim P.G.M. Hurkens, Carlota Mestres-Gonzalvo, Hugo A.J.M. de Wit, Rob Janknegt, Frans Verhey, Jos M.G.A. Schols, Fabienne Magdelijns, Coen D.A. Stehouwer, Bjorn Winkens, Wubbo Mulder and P. Hugo M. van der Kuy. Assessing the strengths and weaknesses of a computer assisted medication review in hospitalized patients. International Journal of Hospital Pharmacy, 2017,2:6. DOI: 10.28933/IJHP-2017-10-0101 
2.Ananth kashyap, Rashmi N G, Rakshith U R, Hanumanthachar Joshi.Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors Induced Serotonin Syndrome –A Case Report. International Journal of Hospital Pharmacy, 2017,2:7. DOI:10.28933/ijhp-2017-10-1101

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Open Access
International Journal of Hospital Pharmacy is a peer reviewed open access journal publishing research manuscripts, review articles, case reports, editorials, letters to the editor in Hospital Pharmacy (indexing details).

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International Journal of Hospital Pharmacy

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