International Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine



A Review on Analgesic Herbals

Review Article of International Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine A Review on Analgesic Herbals Thombre Nilima A.*1, Gaikwad Swati Madhukar 2, Chaudhari Kanchan Subhash3. 1. Met’s Institute Of Pharmacy, Adgaon, Nashik. 2. Met’s Institute Of Pharmacy, Adgaon, Nashik. 3. Met’s Institute Of Pharmacy, Adgaon, Nashik. Analgesics are the substances which are used in pain, without losing consciousness. The word analgesic derives from Greek an- ("without") and algos ("pain"). Analgesic drugs act in various form on the central nervous systems and peripheral nervous system. Various sources of analgesic drugs synthetic analgesic and natural analgesic, natural analgesics like opoid analgesics, Aloevera Barbedensis, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Zingiber Officinale, Eugenia caryophyllata, Cinnamomum camphora, Matricaria pubescens etc. This review gives information about different analgesic obtained from natural sources. Keywords: Natural Analgesics, Aloevera Barbedensis, Eugenia caryophyllata, Cinnamomum camphora, Matricaria pubescens ...

A Brief Review of Indigenous Plants as Sources of Pharmacological Interests

Review Article of International Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine A Brief Review of Indigenous Plants as Sources of Pharmacological Interests AK MOHIUDDIN Faculty of Pharmacy, World University of Bangladesh The knowledge base of pharmacy medicine is changing. Even five decades ago rural people used to visit kobiraj doctors for traditional medication mostly obtained from the roots and leaves of the remote plants (As seen in old dramas and movies). During 70’s to 8o’, a modern allopathy system taken over most of it and plant medicines were completely became obsolete. Even talking about those medicines means people are looking at you saying “what old age are you living?”. Interestingly the same concept is back in the name of modern herbal medicine, anybody will be surprised to know that the sales volume of herbal medicines jumped to Tk 1,000 crore in 2010 against Tk 1 crore in 1980 in Bangladesh. In the language of the philosophers it is “the Circle of Life”. Of course, there's no denying the effectiveness of modern medicine. The drugs used in modern medicine are powerful but quite often, the risks with these drugs are also high. Purpose of the study: An illustrated review of traditional plants, their nature and use, both pharmacological and pharmaceutical. Findings: Traditional plants are used from ancient time for various human well-being, both as life-saving and lifestyle drugs. A careful use of these plants can bring dramatic changes in the history of medicine, on the contrary abuse/misuse is just waste of money and also creates potential health hazards. The emerging use of plant derived medicines should have a proper quality control and system control of sales, distribution and use through strict vigilance.Materials and Methods: A comprehensive literature review, consulting books, technical newsletters, newspapers, journals, and many other sources are done with this review ...

Eve and Evil. Hypnoanalysis of Demonic Possession. A Case-Study.

Case report of International Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine Eve & Evil. Hypnoanalysis of Demonic Possession. A Case-Study. József P. Vas MD H-+527. Soltész Nagy Kálmán u. 1. 1/5, Miskolc, Hungary. A woman, named Eve, has been possessed by Evil. She is continuously tortured by host of visions and cursed by demonic voices. She has a miscarriage and commits suicide several times. The therapist builds up a Jungian type of hypnotherapy and hypnoanalysis based upon Eve’s fairy tale experiences come from her childhood. The patient’s absolute good and evil self- and object representations develop in a mutual relationship each other in the form of miscellaneous symbols. Finally, a prolonged struggle of good and bad symbols arrives at a neutral point of rest. Since the therapist is not afraid of Eve’s experiences he wants to take part in them, which leads to a mutual experience of tandem hypnosis shared by both the patient and the therapist. Facing together with Evil the therapist becomes as a devil in a symbolic way while the devil is made gentle as an uncle of Eve’s life. Finally, the patient’s psychosis is healed. Keywords: demonic possession, hypnotherapy, hypnoanalysis, good and evil symbols, tandem hypnosis ...

A traditional formulation of Shorea robusta resin found effective in excision wound model in rats

Research Article of International Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine A traditional formulation of Shorea robusta resin found effective in excision wound model in rats Shrijana Shakya and Deepak Bashyal Department of Pharmacy, Institute of Medicine A large proportion of the population of developing countries still uses traditional medicines, either as a result of the high cost of Western pharmaceuticals and health care, or because the traditional medicines are more acceptable from a cultural and spiritual perspective(1). The WHO estimates nearly 80% of the population still depends upon herbal medicines due to their easy availability, low cost and possible less side effects as compared to allopathic system of medicines(2). These also cover healthcare systems that include beliefs and practices relating to diseases and health, which are products of indigenous cultural development and are not explicitly derived from a conceptual framework of modern medicine. Ingredients used in the preparation of those remedies may even provide attractive templates for the development of new pharmaceutical products(3). All the people of Nepal have no access to allopathic medicine and health center because of illiteracy, poverty and unavailability. Thus, about 80% of the population in Nepal relies on traditional medicine(4). One such example is the use of formulation containing Shorea robusta resin, prepared by local practitioners themselves, for treating infected wounds and burns by some locals in Kathmandu valley. The ingredients used in traditional medicine, therefore, must be recognized and studied, not only as therapeutic agents with verifiable pharmacodynamic properties, but as agents of healing with beneficial effects, even when the precise mode of activity has not been properly understood(3). Keywords: Antifungal evaluation, Plant extracts, Phytochemicals, Nigerian medicinal plants, Botanical description, Constituuents,Euphorbia hirta, Ficus asperifolia, Momordica charantia, Nicotiana tabacum and Spondias mombin ...

Editor-in-chief: 

Dr. Papiya Bigoniya Professor, Radharaman College of pharmacy, Radharaman Group of Institutes, India.

Editors:

Dr. Zhaoxiang Bian
Associate Vice-President, Chair Professor of School of Chinese Medicine, Director of Clinical Division and Associate Director of Institute of Creativity, Hong Kong Baptist University.

Dr. Woo-Sang Jung
Professor of Cardiology and Neurology (Stroke Center), College of Korean Medicine, Director of Korean Medical Emergency Room, Hospital of Korean Medicine, Kyung-Hee University.

Dr. M J Nanjan
Professor, Physical Chemistry (Retd.) of University of Madras, Chennai, India.

Dr. Daniel Man-yuen SZE
Deputy Program Coordinator for Master of Laboratory Medicine, School of Health & Biomedical Sciences and Health Innovations Research Institute (HIRi), RMIT University, Australia.

Dr. Shamim Ahmad
Professor of Microbiology, Officer In-Charge (Head) & Teacher In-Charge (Administrations), Microbiology Section, Institute of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine , Aligarh Muslim University, India.

Dr. Qingwen Zhang
Associate Professor, Institute of Chinese Medical Sciences (ICMS), University of Macau.

Dr. Ansiur Rahman Khuda-Bukhsh
Former Head, Deptt. of Zoology, University of Kalyani, Presently an Emeritus Professor, University Grants Commission, Govt. of India, at  University of Kalyani.

Dr. Bajpayee Kaptain Kishor
Assistant Professor &HOD in the Botany Department, DR.RML P.G. COLLEGE (C.S.J.M. UNIVERSITY), HARDOI 241001 INDIA.

Dr. Hua-chuan Zheng
Professor, Cancer Research Center; Laboratory Animal Center; The Key Laboratory of Brain and Spinal Injury of Liaoning Province, Laboratory Animal Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Liaoning Medical University, Jinzhou, China.

Dr. Emre Yalcinkaya
ESC Training Fellow in Electrophysiology, Clinic of Cardiology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.

Dr Zhi-Ling YU
Associate Professor, Teaching and Research Division, Fellow, Center for Cancer and Inflammation Research, Director, Master of Pharmaceutical Sciences in Chinese Medicine, Director, Consun Chinese Medicines Research Centre for Renal Diseases, Associate Director, Technology Development Division, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong

Dr. Mario Bernardo-Filho
Professor Titular, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro

Dr Shivani Sanjeev Gavande
Associate professor, Kayachikitsa at Dr. J.J.Magdum Ayurved medical college, Jaysingpur

Dr. Hiroyasu Satoh
Professor, Health Life Science, Shitennoji University, Habikino, Osaka 583-8501, Japan.

Dr. Paolo Roberti di Sarsina
Chairperson, Traditional Complementary and Alternative Medicine of the Observatory and Methods for Health, University of Milano-Bicocca, Milano, Italy.

Dr. Yibin Feng
Professor & Associate Director (Education), School of Chinese Medicine, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.

Dr. Afrozul Haq
Professor & Principal Scientist, R & D Division, VPS Healthcare, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (UAE).

Dr Manuel Fernandes Ferreira

Full Professor, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto Rua do Campo Alegre, S/N Edifício FC4.Portugal.

Dr Jennifer Hunter
Senior Research Fellow, National Institute of Complementary Medicine, Western Sydney University, Australia.

Dr. Jiahong Lu
Assistant Professor, Institute of Chinese Medical Science, The University of Macau.

Dr. William Cho
Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Hong Kong.

Dr. Wenzhe Ma
Assistant Professor, State Key Laboratory of Quality Research in Chinese Medicine, Macau University of Science and Technology, Taipa, Macau.

Dr Swapnil Sabgonda Patil
Assistant Professor, Dept. of Rognidan Avum Vikrutividnyan

Dr. Hongjie Zhang
Associate Professor, School of Chinese Medicine, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong.

Dr. Nitin Mantri
Senior Lecturer in Biotechnology, Health Innovations Research Institute, School of Science, RMIT University, Victoria,  Australia.

Dr Dudhamal Tukaram Sambhaji
Assistant Professor, Dept. of Shalya Tantra, IPGT&RA,Gujarat Ayurveda University, Jamnagar, Gujarat, India.

Dr Thomas Harris
Complex Health Management, 85 Jubilee Av. Forest Lake. Q 4078. Australia.

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References: References should be listed in a numbered citation order at the end of the manuscript. DOIs and links to referenced articles should be added if available. Abstracts and talks for conferences or papers not yet accepted should not be cited. Examples Published Papers: 

1. M. B. FALANA, M. O. BANKOLE and A. M. OMEMU. In Vivo effects of dosage of leaf, bark and root extracts of V. paradoxa on diarhoea-induced albino rats.International Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine 2018, 3:8. DOI: 10.28933/ijtcm-2018-07-0401 
2. Hemanth Kumar Manikyam, C.Ramesh, Krishna Mohan Poluri, Harinath Reddy Kasireddy, Charitha Devi Mekala.Bio-enhancement effect of Bos primigenius indicus urine isolates on Curcumin anticancer activity using different human cell line models of A549, Hep-G2, MCF-7, Jurkat and K562 .International Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine 2017, 2:2. DOI: 10.28933/ijtcm-2017-11-2001 

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International Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine is a peer reviewed open access journal publishing research manuscripts, review articles, case reports, editorials, letters to the editor in Traditional and Complementary Medicine (indexing details).

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International Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine

 

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