Risk Factors of Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension in Block Hazratbal of District Srinagar, Jammu and Kashmir- a Prospective Longitudinal Study


Risk Factors of Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension in Block Hazratbal of District Srinagar, Jammu & Kashmir—-a Prospective Longitudinal Study


Rouf Hussain Rather1, Umar Nazir1, Shazia Benazir2 ,S Mohammad Salim Khan3

1Demonstrator, Department of Community Medicine, Government Medical College, Karanagar Srinagar. 2Senior Resident at Department of Microbiology SKIMS Soura, Srinagar.3Professor and Head Department of Community Medicine, Govt. Medical College, Srinagar.


International Research Journal of Public Health-2D code

INTRODUCTION:The term Pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH) refers to a disorder of blood pressure that arises because of the state of pregnancy. PIH is defined as new onset hypertension with or without significant proteinuria emerging after 20 weeks of gestation, during labour, or in first 48 hours post-partum. Objectives:To find out the risk factors of PIH in block Hazratbal, Srinagar. METHODOLOGY:A Community based longitudinal study was conducted in Block Hazratbal (District Srinagar) for a period of 18 months. All the pregnant females attending the antenatal clinic at the subcenters and PHCs were included in the study and assessed for eligibility. The pregnant women enrolled in the study were examined again around 30 weeks, 37 weeks and once in postnatal period. The information was collected from the study subjects on the basis of pretested semi- structured questionnaire regarding age, educational status, income per capta, occupation, family history of PIH, history of (H/O) hypertension in any family member, H/O addiction, physical activity, gravidity, parity, time since last child birth, H/O PIH in previous pregnancy, height, weight, anemia, edema, gestational age at delivery, fetal gender mode of delivery. RESULTS: Incidence of PIH increased with increasing age and was much higher among those study subjects who had a history of PIH in the previous pregnancy, who had a family H/O PIH, who delivered twins, who had a H/O hypertension in any family member, who had edema at baseline examination and who delivered male babies. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Risk factors of PIH include increasing age, H/O PIH in past, family H/O PIH, family H/O hypertension, male gender of fetus, twin pregnancy and edema in early pregnancy. PIH is a major cause of perinatal mortality, preterm delivery, IUGR, and maternal morbidity and mortality. Awareness about PIH and its risk factors among females and health care workers must be generated.


Keywords:PIH, Risk factors, Twin pregnancy, Srinagar.

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How to cite this article:
Rouf Hussain Rather, Umar Nazir, Shazia Benazir ,S Mohammad Salim Khan. Risk Factors of Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension in Block Hazratbal of District Srinagar, Jammu & Kashmir—-a Prospective Longitudinal Study. International Research Journal of Public Health, 2019; 3:27


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