Clean Water Standards, Environmental Hygiene Sanitation, and Vector Control in Prevention of Disease Transmission in Disaster in Lombok, Indonesia: A Systematic Review of Literature


Clean Water Standards, Environmental Hygiene Sanitation, and Vector Control in Prevention of Disease Transmission in Disaster in Lombok, Indonesia: A Systematic Review of Literature


Ahmadi, Roro Azizah

Fakultas Kesehatan Masyarakat, Universitas Airlangga


International Research Journal of Public Health-2D code

Natural disasters are events that cannot be avoided and desired by everyone. Water and hygiene are important determinants of survival at the beginning of post-disaster. An adequate amount of safe water is needed to prevent deaths from dehydration, therefore in the event of a disaster there is a need for standards to reduce the risk of water-related diseases, sanitation hygiene and vector control. This study aims to explain the concept of water standards, sanitation cleanliness and vector control as humanitarian steps in the event of a disaster. This study shows that the application of these concepts is useful for reducing disease transmission from environmental factors and disease vector exposure. The method in this study uses the epidemiological triangle model approach. Using this method, we set basic standards in humanitarian action at the disaster in Lombok to control the risk of environmental-based diseases. Details of this method are shown in the following which includes the Environment, Agent, and Host. Adjudication is mainly achieved through promoting good hygiene practices, providing safe water, reducing environmental health risks, and controlling infectious disease vectors. This condition will allow people to live healthy with dignity, comfort, and security.


Keywords: clean water standards, disasters, environmental hygiene, sanitation, vector control.

Free Full-text PDF

How to cite this article:
Ahmadi, Roro Azizah. Clean Water Standards, Environmental Hygiene Sanitation, and Vector Control in Prevention of Disease Transmission in Disaster in Lombok, Indonesia: A Systematic Review of Literature.International Research Journal of Public Health, 2019; 3:36.


References

1. Azkha, N. (2009). Peranan Petugas Kesehatan Dalam Penanggulangan Bencana. Jurnal Kesehatan Masyarakat Andalas, 4(1), 1-4.
2. Bustan, M. N. (2008). 505 Tanya Jawab Epidemiologi. Makassar : Putra Asaad print
3. Cronin, A. A., Shrestha, D., Cornier, N., Abdalla, F., Ezard, N., & Aramburu, C. (2008). A review of water and sanitation provision in refugee camps in association with selected health and nutrition indicators–the need for integrated service provision. Journal of water and health, 6(1), 1-13.
4. Nurhidayati, Trisnawati, Oriza Sativa, Robby Wallansha, Artadi Pria Sakti, Sigit Pramono, Dadang Permana. (2018). Ulasan Guncangan Tanah Akibat Gempa Lombok Timur – Indonesia, BMKG
5. Rights, C. (2002). General Comment No. 15 (2002) The right to water (arts. 11 and 12 of the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights). Agenda, 11, 29.
6. Sphere Project. (2011). Humanitarian Charter and minimum standards in humanitarian response, Minimum Standards in Water Providing, Hygiene and Hygiene Promotion, That’s the Sphere Project. p. 83-7.
7. Atuyambe, L. M., Ediau, M., Orach, C. G., Musenero, M., & Bazeyo, W. (2011). Land slide disaster in eastern Uganda: rapid assessment of water, sanitation and hygiene situation in Bulucheke camp, Bududa district. Environmental Health, 10(1), 38.
8. It is the Project Ball, Humanitarian Charter and minimum standards in humanitarian response. Minimum standards . water supply, hygiene and hygiene promotion (WaSH), Sphere Project 2011. p. 88-90.
9. Sphere Project. (2011). Humanitarian Charter and minimum standards in humanitarian response, hygiene promotion standard 1: Implementation of hygiene promotion, Sphere Project, p.91-93
10. Sphere Project. (2011). Humanitarian Charter and minimum standards in humanitarian response, hygiene promotion standard 1: Implementation of hygiene promotion, Sphere Project, p.94-96
11. Sphere Project. (2011). Humanitarian Charter and minimum standards in humanitarian response, Water supply standards 1: Water access and quantity, The Sphere Project, p.97- 99
12. WHO WDEC. Technical notes on drinking water, sanitation and hygiene in an emergency. Account: November 2018 http://www.who.int/water_sanitation_ health/publications/2011/WHO_TN_0
5_Emergency_treatmen_of_drinking_ water_at_the_ point_of_use.pdf
13. Sphere Project.( 2011). Humanitarian Charter and minimum standards in humanitarian response, water supply standards 2: quality water, That is Project Balls, p.100-103
14. WHO-Water Safety Plan: Guidelines: framework for safe drinking water p.22-36
http://www.who.int/water_sani-tation_health / dwq / gdwq3_2.pdf
15. Sphere Project.(2011). Humanitarian Charter and minimum standards in humanitarian response, Vector Control, The Sphere Project. p. 111.
16. Sphere Project.(2011). humanitarian charter and minimum standards in humanitarian response, standard vector control 2: Physical, environmental and chemical protection measures, Sphere Project. p. 113-6.
17. Sphere Project.(2011). Humanitarian Charter and minimum standards in humanitarian response, Vector control standard 1: Individual and family protection, Sphere Project.p.111-3.
18. Ersel, M. (2015). Water and sanitation standards in humanitarian action. Turkish journal of emergency medicine, 15, 27-33.
19. Irwan, (2017), Epidemiologi Penyakit Menular, CV. Absolute Media, Krapyak Kulon-Indonesia