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Assessment of Transport and Logistics Education among Selected Universities in Southwestern Nigeria

Research Article of American Journal of Transportation and Logistics Assessment of Transport and Logistics Education among Selected Universities in Southwestern Nigeria 1Somuyiwa Adebambo and 2Adepoju Olusegun Onifade 1Department of Transport Management, Faculty of Management Sciences; Ladoke Akintola University of Technology and Visiting Professor, Namibia University of Science and Technology,Windhoek, Namibia; 2Department of Transport Management, Faculty of Management sciences; Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, P.M.B. 4000, Ogbomoso, Oyo State, Nigeria This paper assessed the Transport and Logistics Education as a University undergraduate programme being offered by some selected universities in Southwestern Nigeria. The specific objectives of this study are to examine the programmes of transport and logistics education with a view to understand areas where they are lagging behind across the selected Universities. Secondly, to determine those attributes that may facilitate qualitative education, not only in transport sector; but also at improving Nigerian universities education system. The total of 250 recently graduating students of the selected universities were randomly sampled and given both questionnaires and assessment form which covers six major subjects in the areas of Logistics and Transport. Descriptive analytical technique was used to achieve the first objective and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to factorize fifteen identified variables and reduced it to eight principal components considered to facilitate qualitative education in Transport and Logistics Education in Nigeria. The results showcased the areas of strength and weaknesses of the selected schools and principal factors that must be available for qualitative logistics and transport education system in Nigeria. Keywords: Evaluation, Transport and Logistics, Education, Nigerian Universities ...

Complimentary Care: Non-Pharmacological Pain Management

Review Article of International Journal of Pain Research and Treatment Complimentary Care: Non-Pharmacological Pain Management Abdul Kader Mohiuddin Department of Pharmacy, World University of Bangladesh; 151/8, Green Road, Dhanmondi, Dhaka – 1205, Bangladesh Aristotle (4th century B.C.) described pain as emotion, being the opposite of pleasure. Whereas, Buddha stated “Pain is the outcome of sin”, as evidence that an individual was possessed by demons. In some religions it is the cost of attachment. Spiritual counseling thus may be more of a priority than medical management. Many non-physiologic factors (psychological, familial and societal attitudes, life stressors, and cultural or spiritual) contributing to the experience of and response to pain. Emotional stress such as anxiety and depression play a key role in experience of pain. Chronic pain is associated with increased levels of depressive symptoms, anxiety, and insomnia regardless of disability status. it has both modifiable factors (mental health, co-morbidities, smoking, alcohol, obesity, physical activity/exercise, sleep, nutrition, economic status and occupational) and non-modifiable factors (age, sex, cultural and socioeconomic background, history of trauma/ injury/ interpersonal violence, heritage). The relationship between increased BMI and chronic pain in adults seems intuitive and may be related, in part, to increased weight-bearing on joints, reduced physical activity and deconditioning. Patient with physical disabilities may have co-occurring chronic pain, but the prevalence and specific associated factors are unknown. Neuropathic pain (NeP) can be the result of a variety of conditions, including metabolic disease, infection, malignancy, trauma, medications, and toxins; estimates of 60% among those with chronic pain. Chronic pain affects 20% of the European population and is commoner in women, older people, and with relative deprivation. Its management in the community remains generally unsatisfactory, partly because of lack of evidence for effective interventions. Also, family and caregivers’ beliefs and attitudes towards pain, either positively and negatively to tolerate ...

Psychiatric Pharmacy: New role of Pharmacists in Mental Health

Review Article of American Journal of Psychiatric Research and Reviews Psychiatric Pharmacy: New role of Pharmacists in Mental Health Abdul Kader Mohiuddin Department of Pharmacy, World University of Bangladesh, 151/8, Green Road, Dhanmondi, Dhaka – 1205, Bangladesh Psychiatric disorders are one of the major causes of global burden of diseases. Stigma remains a major impediment in the delivery of mental healthcare. It has been found across various studies that attitudes of doctors of other specialties and other healthcare professionals also contribute to stigma due to their lack of knowledge and awareness about psychiatry and mental health problems. The number of mental health professionals remains abysmally low. Community pharmacists are accessible, knowledgeable, and capable of providing mental health promotion and care in communities. This may not be a role that is recognized by the public, and men in particular. However, psychotherapy paired with medication is the most effective way to promote recovery. Examples include: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Exposure Therapy, Dialectical Behavior Therapy, etc. Pharmacists can play a key role by providing mental health medication management support to improve access and address patients’ mental health needs. Keywords: mental health; mental disorders; social stigma; barriers to access mental health; anxiety and depression ...

Liver cirrhosis with high IgG4 in a patient with, diabetes mellitus, ulcerative colitis with papillary thyroid cancer, is it all related ? which one to blame& is it time to raise awareness about IGG4 and hepatobiliary diseases

Research Article of Open Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Liver cirrhosis with high IgG4 in a patient with, diabetes mellitus, ulcerative colitis with papillary thyroid cancer, is it all related ? which one to blame& is it time to raise awareness about IGG4 and hepatobiliary diseases Makki H.Fayadh MRCP UK,FRCP Ed,FRCP London*, Salim Awadh MRCP UK,FRCP London, Tarek Mohamed Badawy, Mahmoud Bahram MD, Ayman Salah Moussa MD, Loai Elkewisny MD, Diaa Eldeeb MD Advanced center for day care surgery Abu Dhabi UAE Back ground: There is possible etiological relation between high IgG4 in a patient with liver cirrhosis, ulcerative colitis, diabetes mellitus , prostatitis ,venous thrombosis and thyroid cancers and the use of immunosuppressive & biologic agents. Method: a study of patient with multiple organ involvement with persistently elevated IgG4. A 56 years old male with persistently elevated IgG4 over 2.5 times normal level, diabetic on insulin, ulcerative colitis on azathioprin & adalimumab developed deep skin pigmentation and liver enzymes elevation with portal hypertension and liver cirrhosis, azathioprine & adalimumab were stopped and golimumab started, after 3 infusions of golimumab papillary thyroid cancer developed .Total thyroidectomy followed by radio iodine after which severe sialo adenitis developed which responded to steroids. His ulcerative colitis was treated with vedolizumab with good response. liver cirrhosis progressed with bleeding varices and portal vein thrombosis with factor Leiden V mutation. Results and conclusions: High IgG4 can be related to many organs including pancreas,liver,thyroid ,small and large bowel,parotid glands ,in this patients all these were affected resulting in colitis,diabetes,liver cirrhosis and thyroid cancer and sialo adenitis. Awareness is needed on the associations with high IgG4. Conclusion: A patient with elevated IgG4 , liver cirrhosis , diabetes mellitus, ulcerative colitis developed skin pigmentation, and papillary thyroid cancer associated with persistently elevated IgG4. Keywords: IgG4 related, liver cirrhosis ...

Arts and Science of Athletic Performance

Review Article of Internal Journal of Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation Arts and Science of Athletic Performance Abdul Kader Mohiuddin Department of Pharmacy, World University of Bangladesh, 51/8, Green Road, Dhanmondi, Dhaka – 1205, Bangladesh Athletes utilize numerous strategies to reduce body weight or body fat and to increase stamina prior to competition. Personalized nutrition in athletic populations aims to optimize health, body composition, and exercise performance by targeting dietary recommendations to an individual’s genetic profile. Additionally, athletes’ nutritional requirements may vary widely depending on sport, position, timing of season, and training vs rest day. Bodily hydration during sporting activity is one of the best indicators of health in athletes and can be a limiting factor for sport performance. Treatment for athletes is primarily to increase energy availability and often requires a team approach including a sport physician, sports dietitian, physiologist, and psychologist. Maximizing athletic performance is a passion that athletes, coaches, athlete support professionals, and sports scientists share. A thorough understanding of the basics of all aspects of human physiology and the ability of the body to adapt to the environmental stress of exercise training is the foundation we use to explain the incredible athletic and sport performances that are commonplace in today’s world. Keywords: performance, endurance, stamina, caloric restriction, altering body composition, lower-body heavy strength training; low energy availability; anabolic steroids ...

Depression Predictors among Older Persons in a Rural Community in South Africa

Research Article of International Research Journal of Public Health Depression Predictors among Older Persons in a Rural Community in South Africa Olurinde A. Oni MD, MPH1 and Olorunfemi E. Amoran MD2 1Department of Clinical Research, Kansas City Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Kansas City, Missouri 64128, USA; 2Department of Community Medicine and Primary Care, Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital, Sagamu, Nigeria Background: Depression is a very important part of global mental health concerns. Many of the studies on correlates of depression stopped short of finding the predictors. Predictive models will empower preventative efforts by healthcare providers and policy makers. The purpose of this study was to determine the factors predicting depressive symptoms among a population of older men and women in rural South Africa. Methods: Data were obtained from “Health and Aging in Africa: A Longitudinal Study of an INDEPTH Community in South Africa (HAALSI) in the INDEPTH Health and Demographic Surveillance System (HDSS) site of Agincourt” in rural Mpumalanga province, South Africa. Previously validated short-version Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D 8) was used to assess for depressive symptoms. Multivariable logistic regression model with stepwise selection, and receiver operating curve were used to examine the predictors of depression. Results: Of the 4027 participants included in this study, 743 (18.5%) met the criterion for depression (CES-D 8 score ≥3). Older age (OR 1.025, CI 1.016-1.034), diabetes (OR 1.467, CI 1.152-1.868), and alcohol consumption (OR 1.536, CI 1.261-1.872) predicted depression. Being male (OR 0.734, CI 0.588-0.915) and homemaker rather than not working (OR 0.513, CI 0.372-0.707) were protective. Compared to those who were married, depressive symptoms were significantly higher among the separated/divorced (OR 1.372, CI 1.027-1.834) and the widowed (OR 1.468, CI 1.172-1.839). Conclusions: It is possible to predict the development of depression in this community, and findings are generalizable to ...