COMPLIANCE AND DOSAGE FORM PREFERENCE IN IRON/ FOLIC ACID SUPPLEMENTATION IN ANTENATAL CARE MOTHERS


COMPLIANCE AND DOSAGE FORM PREFERENCE IN IRON/ FOLIC ACID SUPPLEMENTATION IN ANTENATAL CARE MOTHERS, AYDER COMPREHENSIVE SPECIALIZED HOSPITAL, NORTHERN ETHIOPIA: A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY


Teshome Abegaz, Arega Gashaw

School of Public health, Mekelle University


American Journal of Basic and Applied Sciences

Background: Globally, iron deficiency anaemia is one of the major health problems of pregnant women. Less than one percent took iron supplements during their last pregnancy, and the major problem with iron-folate supplementation during pregnancy is non-compliance. Objective: The aim of this study is to assess prevalence of Compliance and Dosage Form Preference in Iron folic acid supplementation (IFAS) in Antenatal Care (ANC) visit others, Ayder Comprehensive Specialized Hospital, Ethiopia.
Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted at Ayder comprehensive specialized hospital antenatal care from Oct.2018 – Feb.2019.
Result: The total number of study participants was 278 and 172 (63.3 %) were in compliance with iron / folic acid supplementation. The five associated variables indicated significant association at 95% confidence interval for compliance to iron/folic acid supplementation was, age less than 28 years AOR=.044, [.015-.128] , a monthly income AOR=10.304, [3.220-32.970] family size AOR=.144 [.036-.565], four and more ANC visits AOR=4.193, [1.689-10.411, first trimesters and second trimester AOR=21.168, [6.297-71.158] and AOR=4.458, [1.592-12.485] , AOR=4.193, [1.689-10.411] all with p value < 0.05.
Conclusion: In this study, compliance with prenatal iron folate supplementation remains very poor as 63.3%. Mother’s age, monthly income, number of ANC visits, family size and trimesters have been found to be significantly correlated with compliance during pregnancy with prenatal iron foliate supplementation. Therefore, during the ANC visit health workers and health extension workers must regularly advise on IFAS benefits to strengthen adherence to IFAS during current and future pregnancies. For the implementation and refinement of iron supplementation program strategies and acceptable dosage forms, more detailed and in-depth studies are recommended.


Keywords:  compliance, iron, antenatal care, Pregnancy

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How to cite this article:
Arega Gashaw, Biniyam Amare, Firaol Mesfin Ayele. COMPLIANCE AND DOSAGE FORM PREFERENCE IN IRON/ FOLIC ACID SUPPLEMENTATION IN ANTENATAL CARE MOTHERS, AYDER COMPREHENSIVE SPECIALIZED HOSPITAL, NORTHERN ETHIOPIA: A CROSS SECTIONAL STUDY.American Journal of Basic and Applied Sciences, 2020, 3:18


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