WOMEN AND CHILD DEVELOPMENT: ARE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS 2030 ACHIEVABLE? A STUDY OF BRICS COUNTRIES


WOMEN AND CHILD DEVELOPMENT: ARE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS 2030 ACHIEVABLE? A STUDY OF BRICS COUNTRIES


Avik Ghosh and Medha Ganguly Ghosh


American Journal of Public administration

The study is aimed at defining, measuring, analysing and recommending policies pertaining to women and child development in BRICS countries. The developmental initiatives and achievements have been linked with Sustainable Development Goals (SDG 2030). The four relevant goals pertaining to women and children have been earmarked for further analysis and detailed cross-country comparative data analysis has been performed. Key measurement indicators have been benchmarked as focus areas. The outcome was inspiring due to the sustainable and increasing trend of the development indicators. The historical policy initiatives of the BRICS countries have been evaluated and landmark policies have been identified with its impact on the socio-economic development. The impact and necessity of public policy preparation and intervention in the light of targeted goal orientation has been elaborated in the paper. In the conclusion, we have highlighted the positive impact of Neoclassical Realist policymaking to ensure implementable and feasible policies to meet developmental needs of SDG 2030.


Keywords: Women development, Child development, Sustainable Development Goals, Analysis of BRICS countries, Policy interventions, Public Policy


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How to cite this article:
Avik Ghosh and Medha Ganguly Ghosh. WOMEN AND CHILD DEVELOPMENT: ARE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS 2030 ACHIEVABLE? A STUDY OF BRICS COUNTRIES. American Journal of Public administration, 2019,1:10.


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