American Journal of Psychiatric Research and Reviews


The Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic in Psychiatric Outpatient Visits in Abu Dhabi – A Retrospective Study

Research Article of American Journal of Psychiatric Research and Reviews The Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic in Psychiatric Outpatient Visits in Abu Dhabi – A Retrospective Study Dr. Aisha Al Dhufairi (MRCPsych), Dr. Eman Al Houti, Dr. Sumaya Al Marzouqi, Dr. Alaa Al Nuaimi, Dr. Alya Al-Midfa and Dr. Amani Hassan (FRCPsych) Sheikh Khalifa Medical City Introduction: Coronavirus pandemics has affected mental health services around the globe. A marked reduction in psychiatric admission and emergency visits were reported recently. With regards to outpatient services, there was an adoption of tele-psychiatry in mental health facilities in many countries. Objectives: To examine the impact of COVID-19 pandemics on the psychiatric outpatient visits in the largest Psychiatric Hospital in Abu Dhabi, UAE, during the month of April 2020. Methodology: A descriptive retrospective study of medical records of all patients attended the general adult psychiatry clinic in the month of April 2020. Results: 1,050 patients were included in the analysis. The sample consists of 55.9% males. The mean age was 40.7 years. The predominant ethnicity was Arab (88.3%). The most prevalent diagnosis was depressive disorder 32.7%. Only 1.6 % patients attended the clinic as new appointments. Tele-assessment was conducted in 64% (N=672) visits. 9.3 % reported to be in relapse during April. Patient with schizophrenia showed the lowest relapse rate 5.7%. Only 8.5% had taken PCR COVID test, with two patients tested positive. Conclusion: The great shift to tele-assessments and the service of medications home delivery were the main reason for maintaining the service in the psychiatric outpatient settings. Keywords: COVID-19 Pandemic; Psychiatric Outpatient Visits; Abu Dhabi; Retrospective Study ...

COVID-19 Lockdown Fatigue

Research Article of American Journal of Psychiatric Research and Reviews COVID-19 Lockdown Fatigue Tiffany Field1,2*, Shantay Mines2, Samantha Poling2, Miguel Diego1, Debra Bendell2, and Connie Veazey2 1University of Miami/Miller School of Medicine. 2Fielding Graduate University. In this COVID-19 lockdown Survey Monkey study, as many as 75% of 260 respondents reported feeling fatigued. Correlation analyses suggested that feeling fatigued was significantly correlated with demographic variables and virtually every item on every scale of the survey. The demographic correlations suggested that fatigue occurred more frequently in younger participants, in males, and in those not working from home during the lockdown. The significant correlations for the scales suggested that those feeling fatigued engaged in fewer health activities including exercise and self-care; they spent more time on social media including gaming and Facebook; they engaged in less cooking and creative projects; they scored higher on the Stress Scale including worrying more about the virus and their finances; they reported feeling more isolated, lonely, bored and touch deprived; they did more snacking and napping and expressed more “cabin fever”; they had lower scores on connecting and activities at home; and they had higher scores on anxiety, depression, sleep disturbances, and PTSD scales. A regression analysis suggested that 51% of the variance in the fatigue scores was explained by the depression (37% variance), sleep disturbances (12%) and anxiety (1%) scores. These results are limited by their being self-reported data from a non-representative, cross-sectional sample. Nonetheless, they highlight the negative effects of feeling fatigued during a COVID-19 lockdown. Keywords: COVID-19 lockdown; Fatigue; Sleep disturbances; Anxiety; Depression ...

Salvador Dali Meets Sigmund Freud: Paranoia, Narcissism, Snails

Research Article of American Journal of Psychiatric Research and Reviews Salvador Dali Meets Sigmund Freud: Paranoia, Narcissism, Snails John J. Hartman, Ph.D. Affiliate Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, University of South Florida. This paper examines the meeting between the artist Salvador Dalí and Sigmund Freud that took place in London in July of 1938. Freud had just escaped from the Nazi regime in Austria and was about a year away from death. Dalí had been influenced by Freud’s work for many years and had sought to meet his idol on several previous occasions. The meeting, arranged by Freud’s friend, Stefan Zweig, and attended by the poet, Edward James, is noteworthy in that Dalí brought his painting, “Metamorphosis of Narcissus,” a treatise on the subject of paranoia, and sketched Freud’s head conceived as a snail. The paper offers perspectives on each of these events. The meeting is seen in the context of Freud’s artistic sensibility and his relationship to Surrealism. For Dalí the meeting served as a way to break with Surrealism and led to a revised philosophy of art. The paper concludes with the speculation that the meeting was experienced by the artist as an idealizing/envious narcissistic transference with Freud, thus replicating the theme of the painting that the artist had brought with him. Keywords: Breton; Dali; Death instinct; Envy; Sigmund Freud; Lacan; Mirror phase; Mirror transference; Narcissism; Paranoia; Surrealism ...

Education of Healthcare Professionals on an Integrated Care Pathway in order to Standardize Practice and Improve Outcomes for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disability (IDD) who engage in Self-Injurious Behavior (SIB)

Research Article of American Journal of Psychiatric Research and Reviews Education of Healthcare Professionals on an Integrated Care Pathway in order to Standardize Practice and Improve Outcomes for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disability (IDD) who engage in Self-Injurious Behavior (SIB) Dr. Regina Gentlesk Green Stockton University Asst. Professor Assurance Behavioral Health- Training & Community Outreach This paper addresses the lack of knowledge and lack of standardization for treating individuals who engage in self-injurious behavior (SIB) to the head. An evidence-based integrated clinical care pathway is described that was created for health care professionals treating individuals with intellectual and developmental disability (IDD) who engage in frequent and/or significant SIB. It is anticipated that this pathway will increase treatment team knowledge of best practices, decrease clinical variation, standardize care, and improve clinical outcomes with this vulnerable population. Keywords: SIB; IDD, Intellectual and Developmental Disability, Self-Injurious Behavior ...

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1.Sousa, R.A, Silva, W.R; Melo, I.F.O, Silva, A.C.P.S, Vasconcelos, S.C; Silva, T.P.S. to report the experience of training in suicide prevention for health professionals in Pernambuco.American Journal of Psychiatric Research and Reviews, 2018, 1:1 
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American Journal of Psychiatric Research and Reviews (ISSN:2637-479X, DOI:10.28933/AJPRR) is a peer reviewed open access journal publishing research manuscripts, review articles, editorials, letters to the editor in Psychiatric Research and Reviews  (Indexing information).

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American Journal of Psychiatric Research and Reviews

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