American Journal of Psychiatric Research and Reviews


Healing Relationships: co-therapists animals

Review Article of American Journal of Psychiatric Research and Reviews Healing Relationships: co-therapists animals Daniela Maria Bastos de Souza¹; Mariana Gomes do Rêgo²; Lorena D’Andrade Aires³; Ewerton Henrique Brito Silva Cardoso³; Diego Lucas Couto Paes Barreto de Carvalho³ ¹Professor of Pharmacology, Department of Animal Myphology and Physiology, Federal Rural University of Pernambuco. ² Department of Animal Myphology and Physiology, Federal Rural University of Pernambuco. ³Department of Veterinary Medicine, Federal Rural University of Pernambuco. Anxiety and Depression Throughout history, humans have created various “instruments” for the survival of their species, including a need for socialization. These social relationships do not always occur successfully and when they do, there are behavioral changes, such as anxiety disorder, depression and even risk of suicide (SAVALLI; ADES, 2016; SOUSA; OLIVEIRA; CALOUI, 2018). Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) presents as main resources exacerbated fear or anxiety in social situations. Also called Social Phobia, SAD usually manifests itself before or during moments of interaction, as well as in situations where the individual feels observed or exposed to the approval of others (APA, 2013). This disorder is a consequence of one or several factors, whether psychological, biological or arising from lived situations (GOMES, 2014). Those who suffer from SAD tend to exhibit more reclusive habits, reducing their social circle to only their family members and to avoid situations in which they need to speak or even eat in the public. Physically, anxiety disorder usually manifests as hand tremors, flushing, nausea, frequent urination and/or panic attacks, signs that negatively influence the behavior of the affected individual and may cause a more intense degree of social isolation. Social Phobia physiologically impairs the functionality of the hypothalamus, pituitary gland, and adrenal glands, producing changes in production and releasing of several important hormones, such as adrenaline and cortisol. This physiological change implies the ...

ANXIETY

Review Article of American Journal of Psychiatric Research and Reviews ANXIETY José Gildo de Lima – Professor at the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences - Universidade Federal de Pernambuco Aline Cavalcanti de Lira – Pharmacist at Hospital das Clínicas – EBSERH - Universidade Federal de Pernambuco With the changing age structure of the population, epidemiological shifts are observed. The incidence of infectious diseases has declined over the years and has been replaced by chronic diseases such as cardiovascular, cancer, diabetes mellitus, and psychological disorders. Anxiety disorders are more common among people suffering from chronic medical disease, and the number of medical illnesses is positively associated with the presence of anxiety (RAMOS; STANLEY, 2018, p.57). Anxiety disorders are psychological disorders that have their basis in one of the most rudimentary and adaptive human functions: the innate stress response (‘fight or flight’’ response) (ABRAMOWITZ; DEACON, 2010, p. 104). So, it is possible that during our lifetime we may suffer some kind of anxiety disorder. In fact, the stress response is designed to motivate us to protect ourselves by preparing to cope with a perceived threat. But when this stress or fear is disproportionate to actual threat or danger and significantly interferes with normal daily functioning, the person is said to have an anxiety disorder (ABRAMOWITZ; DEACON, 2010, p.104, OLTHUIS; WATT; BAILE; HAYDEN; STEWART, 2015, p.12). While fear is the emotional response to an imminent threat, characterized by an acute autonomic system activation, anxiety is better described as the “anticipation of a future threat” (DONELLI; ANTONELLIA; BELLINAZZIB; GENSINIC; FIRENZUOLID, 2019, p. 2). Anxiety is a disease which affects a large part of the world population. According to (Kessler et al (2007), approximately one in four individuals are likely to have, or have previously had, an anxiety disorder. Keywords: ANXIETY ...

Speech Language Therapy and Mental Health: analysis of communicative behavior and intervention in individuals with schizophrenia

Review Article of American Journal of Psychiatric Research and Reviews Speech Language Therapy and Mental Health: analysis of communicative behavior and intervention in individuals with schizophrenia Ariana Elite dos Santos 1, Luiz Jorge Pedrão 2, Maria Edvany de Melo Pereira 3, Flávia Luiza Costa do Rêgo 4 , José Vinicios Leite Santos 5 1 Speech Language Pathologist, PhD in Science at Postgraduate Program in Psychiatric Nursing of the Ribeirão Preto College of Nursing of the University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil. 2Nurse, Professor of Department of Psychiatric Nursing and Human Sciences of the Ribeirão Preto College of Nursing of the University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil. 3 Speech Language Pathologist, Professor at Unicorp Education Consulting, Recife, PE, Brazil. 4 Speech Language Pathologist, Professor of Depatamento de Fonoaudiologia da Universidade Federal da Paraíba, João Pessoa, PB, Brazil. 5 Law Degree of the Centro de Ciências Jurídicas da Universidade Federal da Paraíba, João Pessoa, PB, Brazil. Speech language intervention in mental health There are still a few literary reports of direct action of Speech Therapy in public care services to individuals diagnosed with mental disorders which is a current challenge for Speech language pathologist. The only mandatory presence of this professional in the minimum team is in Child and Youth Psychosocial Attention Center (PSACc), but not in the Psychosocial Attention Center (PSAC) for example, where the majority of the users are adults (SANTOS et al., 2012). If, on the one hand, mental health outpatient clinics were an important entry point for the speech therapist into the public health system, on the other hand, in front of PSAC implementation, its presence in the teams is not yet consolidated. In 20 years of SUS (Sistema Único de Saúde) and under the aegis of the advances of Psychiatric Reform it is ...

THE ROLE OF ANXIETY ON CHRONIC PAIN AND TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDERS

Review Article of American Journal of Psychiatric Research and Reviews THE ROLE OF ANXIETY ON CHRONIC PAIN AND TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDERS Maurício Kosminsky1, Michele Nascimento2, Aurora Karla de Lacerda Vidal3, Ellen Kosminsky4, Cecília Borba5 1. Assistant Professor at University of Pernambuco, Coordinator of the Orofacial Pain Control Center - University of Pernambuco. 2. Professor of Traditional Chinese Medicine at University of Pernambuco. Assistant of the Orofacial Pain Control Center - University of Pernambuco. 3. Assistant Professor at University of Pernambuco, Head of the Dental Service of Oncology Center, University Hospital Oswaldo Cruz - University of Pernambuco. 4. Undergraduate student of Medicine, Pernambuco Faculty of Health. 5. Undergraduate student of Psychology, Catholic University of Pernambuco. How can society live with anxiety and pain? The discussion about anxiety goes through dentistry as it affects the oral condition. Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) is a very prevalent condition in the population, and mental disorders are often associated with disabilities that affect various activities, also being associated with various diseases and syndromes that present chronic pain, such as chronic Temporomandibular Disorder (TMD). Interactions of exposure to adverse psychosocial events and mental disorders can make the etiological diagnosis of chronic pain a major challenge. Chronic pain is an important public health problem, affecting a relevant portion of the population, interfering with psychological status, social activities and work. Therefore attention and care is needed to control anxiety and promote the quality of life of the population. Keywords: Anxiety disorders; Mental disorders; Chronic pain; Temporomandibular Disorder ...

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1.Sousa, R.A, Silva, W.R; Melo, I.F.O, Silva, A.C.P.S, Vasconcelos, S.C; Silva, T.P.S. to report the experience of training in suicide prevention for health professionals in Pernambuco.American Journal of Psychiatric Research and Reviews, 2018, 1:1 
2.Lima E. S., Lima A. D. The Role of the Psychologist in Palliative Care in Response to Patients With Cancer.American Journal of Psychiatric Research and Reviews, 2018, 1:2 

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American Journal of Psychiatric Research and Reviews (ISSN:2637-479X, DOI:10.28933/AJPRR) is a peer reviewed open access journal publishing research manuscripts, review articles, editorials, letters to the editor in Psychiatric Research and Reviews  (Indexing information).

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American Journal of Psychiatric Research and Reviews

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