Acute soft head syndrome and a mini review of bone and neurologic complications in patients with sickle cell disease


Acute soft head syndrome and a mini review of bone and neurologic complications in patients with sickle cell disease


Ehab Hanafy1,  Saad Al Amri2,  AbdulKareem Alenazi2,  Amal Al Balawi2,  Nadia Abdullah3, Nazim Faisal1, Gihan Mahmoud1

1Prince Sultan Oncology Center, King Salman Armed Forces Hospital, Tabuk, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
2 Pediatric Department, King Salman Armed Forces Hospital, Tabuk, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.
3 Faculty of Medicine, Tabuk University, Tabuk, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.


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Introduction: Acute soft head syndrome is a rare complication in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) that is characterized by progressive skull pain and swelling, it is usually related to skull bone infarction and full recovery is achieved with conservative management. This case represents a very rare association of sickle cell disease and acute soft head syndrome that necessitates to be differentiated from other bone and neurologic presentations occurring in this entity of patients.
Case: We report a rare case of an 11 years old Saudi male patient with sickle cell disease who developed acute soft head syndrome that presented with severe headache. An underlying osteomyelitis of skull and lower limb bones couldn’t be excluded and the patient had full recovery after conservative treatment.
Conclusion: Acute soft bone syndrome seldomly occurs in SCD, however, its presentations mimics those of bone and neurologic complications so differentiation is essential in order to set up a clear plan of management.


Keywords: Sickle cell disease, acute soft head syndrome, stroke, headache, osteomyelitis

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How to cite this article:

Ehab Hanafy, Saad Al Amri, AbdulKareem Alenazi, Amal Al Balawi, Nadia Abdullah, Nazim Faisal, Gihan Mahmoud. Acute soft head syndrome and a mini review of bone and neurologic complications in patients with sickle cell disease. International Journal of Case Reports, 2019 4:80. DOI: 10.28933/ijcr-2019-06-2606


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