The Interesting Link Between Neurocysticercosis and Glioblastoma in a 41-year-old Hispanic Female


The Interesting Link Between Neurocysticercosis and Glioblastoma in a 41-year-old Hispanic Female


Teresita Gonzalez MD1, Pyi Phyo Aung MD1, Atif Hussein MD2

1 Department of Medicine, Memorial Healthcare System, Hollywood, FL
2 Department of Hematology – Oncology, Memorial Cancer Institute, Hollywood, FL


Neurocysticercosis (NC) is a common condition worldwide while glioblastoma is the most common brain cancer among adults but overall, a rare disease. NC is the most common cause of seizures in developing countries. Although no causal relationship is established, there have been an association previously reported between NC and glioblastoma. Here we present a case of a 41-year-old female who was diagnosed with NC, treated with antiparasitic medications who developed worsening neurologic deficits despite treatment, and was subsequently diagnosed with a large left frontotemporal mass consistent with glioblastoma. Patient then underwent treatment with concurrent radiation and temozolomide.


Keywords: Neurocysticercosis; Glioblastoma

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How to cite this article:

Teresita Gonzalez, Pyi Phyo Aung, Atif Hussein. The Interesting Link Between Neurocysticercosis and Glioblastoma in a 41-year-old Hispanic Female. International Journal of Case Reports, 2021; 5:255. DOI: 10.28933/ijcr-2021-11-0705


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