Changing Roles of Care Team Members within New Models of Care Delivery in Residential Care Facilities: Implications for the Delivery of Quality of Care


Changing Roles of Care Team Members within New Models of Care Delivery in Residential Care Facilities: Implications for the Delivery of Quality of Care


Karen M. Kobayashi1*, Ruth Kampen2, Amy Cox3, Denise Cloutier4, Heather Cook5, Deanne Taylor6, Gina Gaspard7, Mushira Mohsin Khan8
1 PhD, Department of Sociology and Institute on Aging and Lifelong Health, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, V8W 3P5, Canada; 2MA, Department of Sociology, University of Victoria; 3MA, Department of Sociology, University of Victoria; 4PhD, Department of Geography and Institute on Aging and Lifelong Health, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC; 5MScN, Interior Health Authority, BC; 6PhD, Interior Health Authority, BC; 7MN, First Nations Health Authority, BC;8MA, Department of Sociology and Institute on Aging and Lifelong Health


international journal of aging research

Providing quality of care (QoC) to older adults in residential care settings is an ongoing challenge given the increasingly complex needs of this population and the escalating economic constraints within which health authorities operate. While the implementation of the residential care delivery model in a Western Canadian health authority has contributed to some improvements in QoC, it has also highlighted key challenges that are both interpersonal and organizational in nature; specifically, gaps in leadership, teamwork, mentorship, and communication, as well as staffing mix, staffing consistency, resident complexity, and competing policy and program initiatives and directives. The implementation of a major change in care delivery impacts residents, families, and staff and may, in turn, impact their perceptions of change in QoC. When evaluating a model, therefore, it is important to examine both qualitative and quantitative outcomes: stories from those most affected in their everyday lives and trends in QoC indicator data.


Keywords: quality of care; long term care; health human resources; older adults; mixed methods; Canada


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How to cite this article:
Karen M. Kobayashi, Ruth Kampen, Amy Cox, Denise Cloutier, Heather Cook, Deanne Taylor, Gina Gaspard, Mushira Mohsin Khan. Changing Roles of Care Team Members within New Models of Care Delivery in Residential Care Facilities: Implications for the Delivery of Quality of Care. International Journal of Aging Research, 2018, 1:17. DOI: 10.28933/ijoar-2018-08-0601


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