Shared Leadership Practices: Do Secondary School Heads in Botswana Matter?


Shared Leadership Practices: Do Secondary School Heads in Botswana Matter?


Dibekulu Alem Asegu

Bahir Dar University


This is an article critique entitled “Shared Leadership Practices: Do Secondary School Heads in Botswana Matter?” by Luke Moloko Mphale as cited in the heading above. The author aims to investigate the perceptions of secondary school heads in Botswana on shared leadership. He raised three research questions for address his purpose. The author of this article raised one of the contemporary issues of leadership “shared leadership” which makes the article timely and important. In line with addressing his purpose the author used 62 school heads used structured questionnaires to collect data from the samples after he has been testing the reliability of the instrument. He found out that leadership is no longer a one man’s show but, a professional work of everyone in the school based on this recommended that for schools to be successful, they should practice a shared leadership model. The reviewer of this article wants to remind that raising the issue as an agenda of discussion and research is most important regardless of some pitfalls to be considered such as issue of generalizability, trustworthiness of findings and instrumentation.


Keywords: Leadership, Shared leadership, Professional, Development

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How to cite this article:
Dibekulu Alem Asegu. Shared Leadership Practices: Do Secondary School Heads in Botswana Matter?.International Journal of Philosophical Research, 2019; 1:5.


References:

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2. human resources. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice Hall.
3. Mphale L. M. (2015). Shared leadership practices: Do secondary school heads in Botswana matter? Journal of Studies in Education. 5(2), 212-223.
4. Republic of Botswana (2008). Towards a Knowledge Society-Tertiary Education Policy. Gaborone: Government Printer.