Cyberspace of the Fourth Scientific and Technological Revolution


Cyberspace of the Fourth Scientific and Technological Revolution


Oleg N. Yanitsky

Doctor of Philosophy, Professor, Chief Researcher, the Federal Center of Theoretical and Applied Sociology of the Russian academy of sciences. Address: 117218, Moscow, Krzizhanovskogo str., 24/35, bld. 5, Russia


International Journal of social research

The aim of the article is to analyze briefly a modern phenomenon of the cyber space from the sociological and environmental viewpoints. The cyberspace is a material system constructed by a man. This space is now shaping by the technical means developed by the Fourth scientific and technological revolution (hereafter the STR-4). As a result, we are now living within a complex and inseparable sociobiotecnical reality of a double quality. It’s both environment and a variety of the agents, social, natural and virtual. The carrying structure of the cyberspace is an all-embracing and all-penetrating informational network. Three models of this space are considered: technocratic, socially constructed and alternative ones. The cyberspace is an instrument of capitalist accumulation, a particular branch of it and self-sustained phenomenon of a high complexity. The basic laws of its development are defined both by technological progress and contradictory global-local trends of evolution of a global whole. The cyberspace is a very mobile structure conditioned by the struggle for resources and geopolitical domination of the global stakeholders and therefore this space works as a promoter of global hybrid wars and other state of emergence. The media is a necessary instrument of a power, more influential than any other social institution of modern society. Therefore, it’s an inseparable part of the cyberspace. At the same time this space is shaped by many civil organizations and the individuals. Finally, the cyberspace is Janus like because it is simultaneously absolutely necessary for users and potentially risky for them.


Keywords:  cyberspace, environment, globalization, information, networks, the STR-4, models, risk, socio-biotechnosphere, self-confrontation, space-time inversion, virtual reality

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How to cite this article:
Oleg N. Yanitsky.Cyberspace of the Fourth Scientific and Technological Revolution. International Journal of Social Research, 2019; 3:24. DOI:10.28933/ijsr-2019-01-2805


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