Toward a bridge theory of modernity: Seeing self and society as processes


Toward a bridge theory of modernity: Seeing self and society as processes


Richard Morehouse

Emeritus Professor of Psychology, Viterbo University


International Journal of social research

The examination and exploration for the nature and meanings of Modernity have been recently presented in philosophy, sociology and psychology books and journal articles. This article presents some of the important ideas in these disciplines and provides a perspective that integrates three disciplines (Philosophy, Sociology, and Psychology) and five authors’ views on Modernity (Charles Taylor, Jaan Valsiner, Anthony Giddens, Herbert Hermans, and Hartman Rosa). The paper first presents an overview of these authors. It goes on to illustrate several common themes of their work: 1) the role of narrative and a semiotic perspective as tools for understanding modernity, 2) a developmental orientation and exploration of how self and society might be seen as developmental processes, and 3) a beginning of a reorienting of philosophy, sociology and psychology as interconnected disciplines. The goal of presenting the views of these authors is to gain a perspective on why it is valuable to understand the historical period we live in (modernity), the roles played by narrative and semiotics and the developmental nature of humans and their culture, and how listening to the melody and tone of modernity aids in understanding modernity.


Keywords: Modernity, Moral Topography, Semiotics, Narrative, Taylor, Valsiner, Giddens, Hermans, Rosa

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How to cite this article:
Richard Morehouse.Toward a bridge theory of modernity: Seeing self and society as processes. International Journal of Social Research, 2020; 4:49. DOI: 10.28933/ijsr-2020-09-1005


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