International Journal of Addiction Research and Therapy


Cultural Competence, Race, and Ethnicity in Community Based Recovery Treatment Programs

Review Article of International Journal of Addiction Research and Therapy Cultural Competence, Race, and Ethnicity in Community Based Recovery Treatment Programs Pascal Scoles, DSW,LCSW Professor, Behavioral Health and Human Services and Director, Office of Collegiate Recovery, Community College of Philadelphia, PA. Cultural competence is more than speaking the language or recognizing the cultural icons of a given group of individuals. Treating the individual is treating their culture. A culturally competent treatment professional must acknowledge an individual’s cultural strengths, values, and experiences while encouraging behavioral and attitudinal change. A significant variable in the change process is the relationship between racial or ethnic matching of clients and counselors. Successful treatment reveals a group of cultural dynamics on how this therapeutic alliance might affect treatment outcomes. To meet these complex cultural challenges, the movement towards a pluralistic cultural framework of helping with its bilingual and bicultural sensitivity appears to be a significant variable to engage the community and the individual in the healing process. Environmental exposures, such as pollution, high-crime areas, and lack of parks or playgrounds, social services, such as transportation, housing, and childcare, mental health care, significantly impact on lifestyle choices. Building strong, grassroots recovery community organizations (RCOs) and linking RCOs into a national movement to develop recovery leaders, offer many opportunities for the recovery community. It helps people in recovery, family members, friends, and allies to express their collective individual and neighborhood voices on issues of common concern by providing a forum for recovery-focused community services that support individual growth. Keywords: Cultural Competence, Race, Ethnicity, Community Based Recovery Treatment Programs ...

Anger and Aggression in Gambling Disorder

Research Article of International Journal of Addiction Research and Therapy Anger and Aggression in Gambling Disorder Arshad Mahmood1, Tony Toneato2* 1Independent Practice. 2PhD. Director, Buddhism, Psychology and Mental Health, New College, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. Higher rates of anger and aggression have been observed in problem gamblers. In this cross-sectional study the relationship between anger, aggression and a community sample of problem gamblers was examined within two subtypes of gambling: Perceived Skill Gambling (sports, cards, track) and Chance Gambling (bingo, lotteries, slot machines) gambling. Aggression and anger were assessed by the Aggression Questionnaire (AQ) and the Trait Anger Scale (TAS), respectively. Results indicated that Perceived Skill Gamblers (i.e., sports, card, track) scored higher on expressing anger on the AQ as well as on the hostility, physical and verbal and aggression subscales of the TAS. There were no sex differences on any AQ subscale except for the Physical Aggression Subscale. We did not find gender differences on the TAS. The study shows evidence that Perceived Skill Gamblers experience more anger, hostility, physical and verbal aggression as measured by the AQ. The current findings contribute to an improved understanding of the complexity of the factors that are implicated in gambling disorder, and suggests that anger and aggression should be routinely assessed among disordered gamblers seeking treatment. Keywords: problem gambling; anger; aggression; gambling treatment ...

Modelling Predictors of Gambling Harms with Stochastic Search Variable Selection (SSVS)

Research Article of International Journal of Addiction Research and Therapy Modelling Predictors of Gambling Harms with Stochastic Search Variable Selection (SSVS) Alysha Cooper, Harvey H. C. Marmurek University of Guelph The purpose of the present study was to introduce stochastic search variable selection (SSVS) as a procedure to identify a subset of important predictors of gambling harm. The target set of predictors were dimensions of trait impulsivity, gambling cognitions, and gambling motivations. Five types of gambling harm (feeling one has a personal problem; social criticism; feeling guilt; health; and, financial) were measured by the Problem Gambling Severity Index. Casino patrons completed the measures. As a first step, we identified the significant predictors that would be included in modelling an aggregate harm score. The most important predictors, the cognition that one is not able to stop gambling, and the motivation to escape or avoid life stressors, were positively associated with overall harm. Two weaker, but statistically significant, predictors were negatively associated with harm: sensation-seeking and illusion of control. Although a perceived inability to stop gambling was the most important predictor of each individual harm, the pattern of predictors varied across harms. For example, sensation-seeking was an important predictor only for the belief that one has a gambling problem, and escape/avoidance motivation was strongly predictive of financial harm. The results suggest that primary interventions designed to mitigate harm should address the belief that the gambler is unable to stop gambling, and motivations related to escape/avoid life stressors. Other interventions would be tailored to the specific harms experience by the gambler. Keywords: Modelling Predictors, Gambling Harms, Stochastic Search Variable Selection (SSVS) ...

Anger, Anxiety and Health Determinants in the Process of Community Recovery

Review Article of International Journal of Addiction Research and Therapy Anger, Anxiety and Health Determinants in the Process of Community Recovery Pascal Scoles, DSW, LCSW Professor, Behavioral Health and Human Services and Director, Office of Collegiate Recovery, Student Life, Community College of Philadelphia, PA The article discusses anger and anxiety in the context of recovery. It relates social determinants of health to individual pathology and how an individuals stress level is related to one’s community. How stressors such as, drug infected areas, lack of access to parks and playgrounds, quality education, etc impact significantly on a person’s anxiety is discussed. To help facilitate healthy change the use of peer specialists and partnering with the faith-based community can create a more comprehensive network of supportive allies. Keywords: Anger, Anxiety, Health Determinants, Community Recovery ...

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International Journal of Addiction Research and Therapy (ISSN:2637-8795; DOI:10.28933/IJART) is a peer reviewed open access journal publishing research manuscripts, review articles, editorials, letters to the editor in Addiction Research and Therapy (Indexing information).

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International Journal of Addiction Research and Therapy

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