International Journal of Food and Nutrition Research


Nutritional potential of anti-anemic drinks based on Manihot esculenta L. or Graptophyllum pictum L. leaf extracts consumed in Yaoundé Cameroon

Research Article of International Journal of Food and Nutrition Research Nutritional potential of anti-anemic drinks based on Manihot esculenta L. or Graptophyllum pictum L. leaf extracts consumed in Yaoundé Cameroon 1Djuikwo Nkonga Ruth Viviane*, 1Djeumen Kouamen Aurélie Ludovine, 2Yadang Germaine, 2Panyoo Emmanuel, 1Mananga Marlyne, 3SAHA FOUDJO Brice Urich, 1Djouhou Fowe Michelle Carole, 1Fokou Elie 1Laboratory for Food Sciences and Metaboism, University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon; 2Department of Food Sciences and Nutrition, National School of Agro-Industrial Sciences, University of Ngaoundéré, Cameroon; 3Département of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Université of Bamenda. Anemia is a global public health problem. In Cameroon, the most vulnerable to anemia are children under 5 years of age (60%) and pregnant women (40%). To reduce prevalence of anemia, several approaches have been adopted, including promoting the production and consumption of iron-rich foods/products. The objective of this work was to study the nutritional potential of anti-anemic drinks based on extracts from the leaves of either Manihot esculenta or Graptophyllum pictum consumed by the populations of the city of Yaoundé in Cameroon. Macronutrient contents were determined using the standard A.O.A.C. methods, while mineral contents were analyzed using the atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Bioactive compounds such as total polyphenols, flavonoids, and saponins were analyzed. Vitamin C was determined by the 2,6 dichlorophenol indophenol spectrophotometric method (DCPIP) and the contents of anti-nutrients (tannins, phytates, oxalates, saponins, hydrocyanic acid) quantified using standard methods. The results of these analyses show that the mean protein contents in the studied anti-anemic drinks ranged from 0.64 ± 0.08 g/100 mL to 1.84 ± 0.02 g/100 mL (M. esculenta drink); and 0.25 ± 0.01 g/100 mL (G. pictum drink). Sugar contents ranged from 0.30 ± 0.02 g/100 mL to 0.45 ± 0.01 g/100 mL (M. esculenta drink), and 0.29 ± 0.01 g/100 mL (G. pictum drink). As concerns iron ...

In-Vitro protein digestibility, physico-chemical properties and nutritional quality of sorghum-green gram cookies supplemented with mango powder

Research Article of International Journal of Food and Nutrition Research In-Vitro protein digestibility, physico-chemical properties and nutritional quality of sorghum-green gram cookies supplemented with mango powder Rahma Thuiya Ali1*, Catherine N. Kunyanga1, Kahiu Ngugi2 1Department of Food Science, Nutrition and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, College of  Agriculture and Veterinary Sciences, University of Nairobi, P.O Box 29053-00625 Kangemi, Nairobi, Kenya. 2Department of Plant Science and Crop Protection, Faculty of Agriculture, College of  Agriculture and Veterinary Sciences, University of Nairobi, P.O Box 30917-00100, Nairobi. Ready to Eat (RTE) sorghum cookies were prepared by incorporating green gram flour at 10%, 20%, 30%, dried mango powder at 10% and evaluated for their physico-chemical and nutritional properties. Protein, fat, fiber and ash increased with increase in green gram flour substitution as carbohydrate content decreased significantly. Significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) in protein content were seen in cookies ranging from 9.52% to 13.60%. Fiber increased significantly from 9.40% to 10.90%. In vitro protein digestibility ranged from 67.75 ± 0.01% to 90.05 ± 0.10 %. Vitamins analysed increased with addition of green gram flour. Thiamine content ranged from 0.22±0.02 to 0.61±0.02 mg/100g, riboflavin from 0.09±0.00 to 1.39±0.04 mg/100g and ascorbic acid from 13.87±0.79 to 19.31±0.94 mg/100g. Value addition of under-utilized crops like sorghum and green grams can play a vital role in development of high nutritional quality RTE products. Keywords: In-Vitro protein digestibility, physico-chemical, nutritional quality, ready-to-eat, sorghum, cookies ...

Food security in the time of Coronavirus (COVID-19). The Argentine case

Research Article of International Journal of Food and Nutrition Research Food security in the time of Coronavirus (COVID-19). The Argentine case Leda Giannuzzi Toxicology Laboratory, Exacts Sciences College, National University of La Plata (UNLP), La Plata, Buenos Aires. Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo en Criotecnología de Alimentos (CIDCA), CCT-La Plata. Facultad Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata. Street 47 and 116 (1900) La Plata, Argentina. The context of pandemic of the human coronavirus COVID-19, preventive strategies based on mandatory social isolation (quarantine) were imposed by governments to reduce transmission in the community. However, they have had a strong impact on the economies of the countries and on the people as massive layoffs, decreased wages, uncertainty, inability to work formally, increasing precariousness and inequality and food insecurity. Without a doubt, the pandemic surprised Argentina without the necessary tools to amortize the attacks of the disease, and all the collateral consequences that emerge from it. The concept of food insecurity represents a situation or a process experienced by households in which there is a limited and uncertain availability of the quantity and quality of food that allow covering the nutritional requirements of people, thus as an also limited and uncertain availability of the ability to acquire them in an acceptable way from a social and cultural perspective. This work addresses household food insecurity at the micro-social level based on their own surveys and describes the strategies carried out by households in the metropolitan area of Buenos Aires city, Argentina to withstand the effect. FI status was assessed among 200 adult university students a mean age of 28±6 years (57% female, 43% male) during isolation period in April -May 2020 using the food insecurity experience scale (FIES). The students responded affirmatively and with a higher percentage value to the items related to ...

In-Vitro Starch Hydrolysis and Prediction of Glycaemic Indices of Biscuits Produced from Wheat, African Walnut and Moringa Seed Flour Blends

Research Article of International Journal of Food and Nutrition Research In-Vitro Starch Hydrolysis and Prediction of Glycaemic Indices of Biscuits Produced from Wheat, African Walnut and Moringa Seed Flour Blends Wabali, Victor Chigozie1, Giami, Sunday Yortee2, Kiin-Kabari, David Barine2* and Akusu, Ohwesiri Monday2 1Department of Food, Home Science and Nutrition, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Port Harcourt, Rivers State, Nigeria. 2Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, Rivers State University, Nkpolu-Oroworukwo, Port Harcourt, Nigeria. African walnut and moringa seed were procured and processed into flours. Biscuits were thus produced from different blends of wheat flour (WHF), African walnut flour (AWF) and moringa seed flour (MSF) in the ratios of (WHT:AWF:MSF) 100:0:0, 77.5:20:2.5, 75:20:5, 72.5:20:7.5, 70:20:10, 90:0:10, 80:20:0 and labelled from A to G, respectively. The produced biscuits were evaluated for dietary fibre content, in-vitro starch hydrolysis and predicted glycaemic indices. The results of dietary fibre content of the biscuits revealed that sample E was significantly higher with a value of 0.72g compare to other samples. Dietary fibre content of the biscuits increased as the level of substitution with moringa seed flour increased. Results of the in-vitro starch hydrolysis of the biscuits showed that the percentage starch hydrolysed reached its peak at 120 min of digestion and after which, a reduction steps in as digestion time increases. Equilibrium concentration, hydrolysis index and predicted glycaemic indices of the biscuits reduced as the level of substitution of moringa seed flour increased. It revealed sample E with Equilibrium concentration value of 48.06, hydrolysis index of 51.66% and predicted glycaemic index of 68.07. Thus, the blends of 70:20:10 (WHT:AWF:MSF) which represented sample E could be used as medium glycaemic index food. Keywords: Dietary fibre; Starch hydrolysis; Glycaemic index; Biscuits; Moringa seed; African Walnut ...

Dr. Xue Wu ZHANG
Professor, South China University of Technology, 381 Wushan Road, Guangzhou 510640, People’s Republic of China

Dr. Yuan Soon Ho
Distinguished Professor/Director, Graduate Institute of Medical Science, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University

Prof. Dr. Mahmoud Abd-Allah Mohamed Saleh
Chief Researcher , Special Food & Nutrition, Dept., Food Technology Res. Inst (FTRI), Agric. Res. Center, (ARC), 9 El-Gamma st., Giza, Egypt

Dr. Khaled Saad Zaghloul Ali
Associate Professor, Faculty of Medicine, Pediatric Department, Assiut University

Dr. Vikas Kumar
Assistant Professor (Food Technology and Nutrition), School of Agriculture, Lovely Professional University

Dr. Majid Sharifi-Rad
Department of Range and Watershed Management, Faculty of Natural Resources, University of Zabol

Dr Rodney Alexandre Ferreira Rodrigues
Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Centro Pluridisciplinar de Pesquisas Químicas e Biológicas

Dr. Carolina Veronezi
Research Scientist & Teacher, University of the State of Minas Gerais – UEMG and Union of Great Lakes Colleges – UNILAGO

Dr. Pankaj Kumar Singh
Assistant Professor, Department of Animal Nutrition, Bihar Animal Sciences University

Dr. Guang Hao
Georgia Prevention Institute, Department of Population Health Sciences, Medical College of Georgia. Augusta University

Dr. Umar Farooq
Associate Professor, Department of Food Science and Technology, Muhammad Nawaz Shareef University of Agriculture

Dr. Ionel BONDOC
Associate Professor, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Iasi, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine Iasi (ROMANIA), Department of Public Health

Dr. Leqi Cui
Assistant Professor, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi, China

Dr. Heba Hassan Abd-El Azim Salama
Associate Professor, National Research Centre, Food Industries and Nutrition Division

Dr. Jong-Bang Eun
Professor, Department of Food Science and Technology, College of Agriculture and Life Science, Chonnam National University

Dr. Monica BUTNARIU
Professor, habilitated doctor, chemist, Chemistry & Biochemistry Discipline, Banat’s University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine “King Michael I of Romania” from Timisoara, 300645, Calea Aradului 119, Timis, Romania,

Dr. Victor Hugo Gomes Sales
Professor, Department of food technology, Instituto Federal do Amapá

Dr. Kamila Nascimento
PhD in Food Science and Technology – Federal Rural University of Rio de Janeiro – RJ, Brazil

Dr. Krešimir Mastanjević
Assistant Professor, Name and address of employer, Type of business or sector University in Osijek, Faculty of Food Technology, Franje Kuhača 20, 31000 Osijek, Croatia Science and higher education

Dr. Theophine Akunne
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Nigeria, Nsukka 410001, Nigeria

Dr Kasim S. Abass
Assistant Professor, College of Nursing, University of Kirkuk

Dr Zhuo Wang
The Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, PA

Dr. Sheikh Adil Hamid
Assistant Professor, Division of Livestock Production and Management, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences and Animal Husbandry

Dr Nishant P. Visavadiya
Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, USA

Dr. Poliana Mendes de Souza
Federal University of Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri

Dr. Rajinder Pal Singh Bajwa
Niagara Falls Mem Med Center, Division of Infectious Diseases, 621 Tenth Street, Niagara Falls, NY 14301.

Dr. Subrota Hati
Assistant Professor, Dept. Dairy Microbiology, Anand Agricultural University

Dr. İlknur UCAK
Assistant Professor, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences and Technologies, Nigde Omer Halisdemir University

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1. Agustina Irazusta, Russell Caccavello, Luis Panizzolo, Alejandro Gugliucci, Alejandra Medrano. The potential use of Mentha x piperita L., Peumus boldus Mol. and Baccharis trimera Iless. extracts as functional food ingredients. International Journal of Food and Nutrition Research, 2018; 2:14. DOI: 10.28933/ijfnr-2018-09-1001 
2. Rabia Syed and Ying Wu.A review article on health benefits of Pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp). International Journal of Food and Nutrition Research, 2018; 2:15. DOI: 10.28933/ijfnr-2018-09-0301

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International journal of food and nutrition research

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