International Journal of Food and Nutrition Research


Impacts of Climate Change on Fish Production and Its Implications on Food Security in Developing Countries

Review Article of International Journal of Food and Nutrition Research Impacts of Climate Change on Fish Production and Its Implications on Food Security in Developing Countries Tsedeke Debebe Tefera and Selamawit Fentahun Ali School of Veterinary Medicine, Wollo University Fish plays a great role on nutritional status by providing essential amino acids, vitamin and nutrients that are deficient in staple foods. The review was conducted to review the potential physical and biological impacts of climate change on fisheries and to highlights some mitigation and adaptation measures to promote fish production. The impacts of climatic change on fisheries in developing countries classified as physical and biological changes. Physical changes including water surface temperature rise, ocean acidification, sea level rise, salinity, flooding and change in harvesting sector. Biological changes including changes in primary production change in fish distribution and fish diseases. Elevated water temperatures affect fish physiological processes, there by affecting reproduction and survival of the fish larvae. The impacts of increased flooding of the freshwater bodies will be negative through destruction of fish feeding and breeding habitats, or positive in expansion of aquatic habitats for primary production. Rise in the sea level lead to intrusion of more salty water into the river areas thus affecting distribution of fish and high wind can interfere catching and trade activities. These climatic factors interferes food security directly through limiting the availability of fishes to human diet and indirectly by reducing cash revenue obtaining from fish trade to purchase other food items. Therefore, implementing adaptation and mitigation pathways safeguard this sector and improve food security. Keywords: climate change, fisheries, food security, mitigation ...

Optimization of Local Wort and Fermented Beer from Barley as Substitute Raw Material for Ethanol Production Using Response Surface Methodology

Research Article of International Journal of Food and Nutrition Research Optimization of Local Wort and Fermented Beer from Barley as Substitute Raw Material for Ethanol Production Using Response Surface Methodology Zinabu Hailu, Basha Mekonnen Chemical Engineering Department, Adigrat University The research work was aimed to find the exact optimized operating temperature, time, pH and substrate which is important for the production of wort and fermented beer in both mashing and fermentation processes. Here, the barley was used as a basic source of substrate and enzymes. To determine the optimum operating temperature, pH, time and substrate under mashing and fermentation processes, Central Composite Experimental Design (CCD) was used. The results showed that, the maximum % malt extracts (92.36 %), fermentable sugar (10.53 oBx) were observed at 70oC, 120 min., pH value of 4.5 and 30 gm substrate source addition. After optimizing the wort, the fermentation experiment was conducted accordingly the combination which was given by design expert software. The maximum degree of attenuation value (86 %) was observed at 20oC, 96 hr, and pH value of 4.4 and 75 gm substrate source added. Therefore, good barley type and optimum condition for mashing and fermentation process were found to be significant effect for high wort, and distillery beer. Keywords: Mashing, Attenuation, Fermentable sugar, Optimization, Wort ...

Magnitude and associated factors of goiter, and iodized salt utilization among adolescent girls in the highland area of North Shewa zone, Central Ethiopia

Research Article of International Journal of Food and Nutrition Research Magnitude and associated factors of goiter, and iodized salt utilization among adolescent girls in the highland area of North Shewa zone, Central Ethiopia Abayneh Birlie Department of Public Health, College of health Science, Debre Birhan University Background: Iodine deficiency disorder is a common and preventable global public health problem that causes irreversible mental retardation. IDD is more prevalent in developing countries, especially in mountain areas. Therefore this study aimed to assess the magnitude and associated factors of goiter among adolescent girls. The knowledge and utilization of iodine-rich foods and iodized salt of adolescent girls in the highland area of North Shewa zone, Central Ethiopia was also assessed. Methods: An institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted from October 5, 2018, to December 30, 2019. A multistage sampling technique was used to select 477 adolescent girls from 12 schools. A pre-tested structured self-administered questionnaire, anthropometric measure and thyroid gland examination were used for data collection. The collected data were entered into Epi Data 3.1 software and analyzed using Anthro plus and SPSS version 21 software. Results: The overall prevalence of goiter was 50.4% of which 35.4% were palpable and 15.0% were visible goiter. Being post-menarche (AOR=3.241, 95% CI= (1.288-8.152)) and thin (AOR=1.124, 95% CI= (1.068-14.680)) adolescent girl increased the risk goiter. Two hundred seventy (60.8%) adolescent girls had awareness about salt iodization and 54.5% girls said it is important to prevent goiter. Though packed salt was used by 58.2% only 30.6% of households of adolescent girls add salt immediately before the end of cooking or after cooking. Conclusions: Goiter is a serious health problem that affects about half of adolescent girls in the study area. The risk of developing goiter was higher among girls who initiated menstruation and suffered from thinness. There is low ...

Compositional analysis of genetically modified soybeans placed on Taiwan market

Research Article of International Journal of Food and Nutrition Research Compositional analysis of genetically modified soybeans placed on Taiwan market Huan-Yu Lin1, Jen-Tao Chen1, Mei-Li Chao1, Bo-Chou Chen1, Jo-Chi Wang1, Hsuen-Chun Liao1, Hui-Wen Chang1, Hsin-Tang Lin2 and Wen-Shen Chu1* 1Bioresource Collection and Research Center, Food Industry Research and Development Institute, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan; 2Food and Drug Administration, Ministry of Health and Welfare, Taipei 115, Taiwan(Present: Graduate Institute of Food Safety, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan) Soybean is an important protein source for consumers in Taiwan. Soybean production in Taiwan is not self-sufficient. Taiwan imports 2.5 million tons of soybeans annually. More than 90% of the imported soybeans are genetically modified (GM). To provide an objective assessment on safety of GM soybean and for post-market monitoring, we conducted a comparative assessment on key component compositions between imported GM soybean and local non-GM soybean from Taiwan. All the soybean samples were purchased from the local market to simulate the status of Taiwanese consumers in purchasing soybeans. The GM soybean samples were herbicide-tolerant soybeans. The content of the proximate, the amino acid composition, the fatty acid composition, vitamins, minerals, antinutritional factors, and isoflavones of soybean samples were analyzed. Most contents of the key components of the GM soybean had no significant difference with those of the non-GM soybean. However, the contents of ash, crude protein, amino acids, myristic acid, behenic acid, phosphorus, iron and phytic acid were significantly lower in the GM soybean samples, and the contents of crude fat, margaric acid, and stearic acid were significantly higher in the GM soybean samples. But they were all within the range of reference values. A total of 314 pesticide residues in each of the samples were analyzed. Glyphosate residue was detected only in GM soybean samples, but it is well below the threshold ...

Dr. Xue Wu ZHANG
Professor, South China University of Technology, 381 Wushan Road, Guangzhou 510640, People’s Republic of China

Dr. Yuan Soon Ho
Distinguished Professor/Director, Graduate Institute of Medical Science, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University

Prof. Dr. Mahmoud Abd-Allah Mohamed Saleh
Chief Researcher , Special Food & Nutrition, Dept., Food Technology Res. Inst (FTRI), Agric. Res. Center, (ARC), 9 El-Gamma st., Giza, Egypt

Dr. Khaled Saad Zaghloul Ali
Associate Professor, Faculty of Medicine, Pediatric Department, Assiut University

Dr. Jiban Shrestha
Scientist, Nepal Agricultural Research Council, National Maize Research Program, Rampur, Chitwan, Nepal

Dr. Vikas Kumar
Assistant Professor (Food Technology and Nutrition), School of Agriculture, Lovely Professional University

Dr. Majid Sharifi-Rad
Department of Range and Watershed Management, Faculty of Natural Resources, University of Zabol

Dr Rodney Alexandre Ferreira Rodrigues
Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Centro Pluridisciplinar de Pesquisas Químicas e Biológicas

Dr. Carolina Veronezi
Research Scientist & Teacher, University of the State of Minas Gerais – UEMG and Union of Great Lakes Colleges – UNILAGO

Dr. Pankaj Kumar Singh
Assistant Professor, Department of Animal Nutrition, Bihar Animal Sciences University

Dr. Guang Hao
Georgia Prevention Institute, Department of Population Health Sciences, Medical College of Georgia. Augusta University

Dr. Umar Farooq
Associate Professor, Department of Food Science and Technology, Muhammad Nawaz Shareef University of Agriculture

Dr. Ionel BONDOC
Associate Professor, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Iasi, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine Iasi (ROMANIA), Department of Public Health

Dr. Leqi Cui
Assistant Professor, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi, China

Dr. Heba Hassan Abd-El Azim Salama
Associate Professor, National Research Centre, Food Industries and Nutrition Division

Dr. Jong-Bang Eun
Professor, Department of Food Science and Technology, College of Agriculture and Life Science, Chonnam National University

Dr. Monica BUTNARIU
Professor, habilitated doctor, chemist, Chemistry & Biochemistry Discipline, Banat’s University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine “King Michael I of Romania” from Timisoara, 300645, Calea Aradului 119, Timis, Romania,

Dr. Victor Hugo Gomes Sales
Professor, Department of food technology, Instituto Federal do Amapá

Dr. Kamila Nascimento
PhD in Food Science and Technology – Federal Rural University of Rio de Janeiro – RJ, Brazil

Dr. Krešimir Mastanjević
Assistant Professor, Name and address of employer, Type of business or sector University in Osijek, Faculty of Food Technology, Franje Kuhača 20, 31000 Osijek, Croatia Science and higher education

Dr. Theophine Akunne
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Nigeria, Nsukka 410001, Nigeria

Dr Kasim S. Abass
Assistant Professor, College of Nursing, University of Kirkuk

Dr Zhuo Wang
The Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, PA

Dr. Sheikh Adil Hamid
Assistant Professor, Division of Livestock Production and Management, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences and Animal Husbandry

Dr Nishant P. Visavadiya
Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, USA

Dr. Poliana Mendes de Souza
Federal University of Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri

Dr. Rajinder Pal Singh Bajwa
Niagara Falls Mem Med Center, Division of Infectious Diseases, 621 Tenth Street, Niagara Falls, NY 14301.

Dr. Subrota Hati
Assistant Professor, Dept. Dairy Microbiology, Anand Agricultural University

Dr. İlknur UCAK
Assistant Professor, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences and Technologies, Nigde Omer Halisdemir University

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1. Agustina Irazusta, Russell Caccavello, Luis Panizzolo, Alejandro Gugliucci, Alejandra Medrano. The potential use of Mentha x piperita L., Peumus boldus Mol. and Baccharis trimera Iless. extracts as functional food ingredients. International Journal of Food and Nutrition Research, 2018; 2:14. DOI: 10.28933/ijfnr-2018-09-1001 
2. Rabia Syed and Ying Wu.A review article on health benefits of Pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp). International Journal of Food and Nutrition Research, 2018; 2:15. DOI: 10.28933/ijfnr-2018-09-0301

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International journal of food and nutrition research

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