International Journal of Food and Nutrition Research


Evaluation of Yield and Physicochemical Properties of Single Cereal Grain Akamu and Pre- and Post- Processed Multigrain Cereal Akamu Powders

Research Article of International Journal of Food and Nutrition Research Evaluation of Yield and Physicochemical Properties of Single Cereal Grain Akamu and Pre- and Post- Processed Multigrain Cereal Akamu Powders Obiegbuna, J.E*., Nwankwo, J.A., Ozue, J.O. and Okolo A.C. Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Awka, Anambra State, Nigeria The yield and physicochemical properties of single grain and multigrain akamu powders were evaluated. Akamu, ogi or pap, powders were produced by soaking (fermenting) cereal grains (48-72 h), wet-milling, sieving, dewatering, drying (50oC) and pulverizing maize (MBA), pearl millet (PMBA) and sorghum (SBA). Multigrain akamu was produced by co-fermenting equal proportions of maize, pearl millet and sorghum (Blend1); and singly fermenting these cereals and blending the end products (Blend2). Yield, proximate and mineral compositions, functional and sensory properties of akamu were analyzed following established methods. The yield of MBA, PMBA, SBA, Blend1 and Blend2 were respectively 60%, 70%, 80%, 53.33% and 68.67%. Chemically, SBA had significantly (p<0.05) higher protein (10.17%), fiber (8.00%), iron, zinc, potassium and sodium contents than MBA and PMBA. The carbohydrate content of PMBA (69.27%) was higher (p < 0.05) than that of MBA (66.20%) and SBA (66.30%). PMBA had the lowest protein (7.55%) and MBA the lowest fiber (3.97%) content. The fat (6.27%) and ash (4.67%) of PMBA were significantly higher than that of SBA with 5.47% and 2.00%, respectively. Only the ash, carbohydrate, iron and sodium contents of multigrain akamu differed significantly (p<0.05) with Blend1 having higher carbohydrate and iron values but lower ash and sodium values. The water absorption capacity (WAC) of PMBA (1.87 g/g) was lower (p<0.05) than other single and multi grain samples. MBA had lowest emulsion activity (EA) (44.33%) but highest emulsion stability (ES) of 77.43% while SDA had the highest EA (50.00%). The ES of PMBA ...

Comparison between creatine monohydrate and creatine HCl on body composition and performance of the Brazilian Olympic team

Research Article of International Journal of Food and Nutrition Research Comparison between creatine monohydrate and creatine HCl on body composition and performance of the Brazilian Olympic team Caroline Ayme Fernandes Yoshioka1, Diana Madureira2, Paulo Carrara3, Natália Gusmão2, Kamila Santos Ressureição4, Jeferson Oliveira Santana2, Marco Aurélio Lamolha2, Renata Furlan Viebig4, Iris Callado Sanches2, Fabio Santos de Lira5, Erico Chagas Caperuto6 1UNICAMP – Brazil; 2São Judas Tadeu University – Brazil; 3São Paulo University – USP – Brazil; 2São Judas Tadeu University – Brazil; 4Mackenzie Presbiterian University – Brazil; 2São Judas Tadeu University – Brazil; 2São Judas Tadeu University – Brazil; 4Mackenzie Presbiterian University – Brazil; 2São Judas Tadeu University – Brazil; 5UNESP – Brazil; 6São Judas Tadeu University and Mackenzie Presbiterian University – Brazil Weight-dependent athletes have trouble to balance the energy consumption to the needs of the sport they practice. As performance depends on that balance, it would be ideal to find a supplement that would be ergogenic without promoting weight increase. Monohydrate creatine supplementation is effective to improve strength and power but water retention and weight gain are side effects that avoid its use. An alternative molecule, creatine HCl, proposes the same an ergogenic effects without the undesirable effects. So, this study compared the effects of both creatines on performance and body composition of elite gymnastics athletes. 11 males, 18 to 25 years old took part into the randomized cross-over model: Creatine Monohydrate Supplement (MCG), resistant starch (RS) and HCl Supplement (HClG). Pre and Post all the experimental conditions, body fat percentage, body weight, lean body mass and total water amount were measured, bench press and leg press 1RM test were also carried out. Lean mass increased with both treatments (p <0.05), fat percentage decreased only with HCl (p <0.05) and strength gains were significantly improved for both supplements. We concluded that both creatines improve strength but only HCl allows this effect without ...

Drivers of Food Choice among Lactating Women: The Case of Debrebirhan Town, North Shoa Zone, Amhara Region, Ethiopia

Research Article of International Journal of Food and Nutrition Research Drivers of Food Choice among Lactating Women: The Case of Debrebirhan Town, North Shoa Zone, Amhara Region, Ethiopia Gesessew Kibr1*, Afework Mulugeta 2, Tafese Bosha3 1Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Wollega University, Shambu, Ethiopia; 2Department of Public Health, Mekelle University, Mekelle, Ethiopia;3School of Nutrition, Food Science and Technology, Hawassa University, Hawassa, Ethiopia While access to foods and more information on healthy eating are important, decisions to adopt health-enhancing behavior of lactating women (nutritional vulnerable group) are often constrained by socio-economic barriers, personal and food related drivers that influence food choice. Therefore, this study aimed to assess drivers of food choice, & socio-economic variables associated with drivers of food choice among lactating women in Debrebirhan Town. A survey study was conducted on 423 randomly selected lactating women. Data was collected by face to face interview and analyzed via SPSS version 20. Logistic regression analysis was used to find association b/n socio-economic variables and drivers of food choice. P-value < 0.05 was taken as statistically significant. Influences of religion, price, preparation convenience, health value and taste during food choice were responded by above half of women (92%, 84%, 83%, 66% & 56%). From multivariate analysis of binary logistic regression, influence of mood in food choice was associated to age (15-25 and 26-35 years) and estimated monthly income (≤3500 vs.>3500 ETB) with AOR (95%CI) of 3.24(1.3-8.08), 3.95(1.85-8.4) and 1.83(1.03-3.24). Age (15-25 & 26-35 years) was associated to choosing of foods for weight management with AOR (95%CI) of 2.64(1.12-6.22) and 3.52(1.66-7.43). 15-25 years’ age and self-employee were linked to religion influence in food choice with AOR (95%CI) of 0.09(0.01-0.48) and 4.13(1.4-12.24). Age (15-25 & 26-35 years), education (no, primary & secondary) and being housewife were associated to choosing of foods for their health value ...

Evaluation of the Physico-chemical, Functional and sensory attributes of instant fufu developed from bitter yam (Dioscorea dumetorum)

Research Article of International Journal of Food and Nutrition Research Evaluation of the Physico-chemical, Functional and sensory attributes of instant fufu developed from bitter yam (Dioscorea dumetorum) Felix Narku Engmann1* and Rita Elsie Sanful2 1Faculty of Applied Sciences and Technology, Kumasi Technical University, Kumasi, Ghana; 2Department of Hotel, Catering and Institutional Management, Cape Coast Technical University, Cape Coast, Ghana In this study, the eating qualities and physicochemical properties of three fufu samples were produced and evaluated, while the functional properties of the fufu flours were also determined. The results obtained for the functional properties of swelling power were 12.26, 12.13, and 12.35; solubility 8.73, 6.79 and 5.27; water binding capacity 276.15, 261.02 and 280.05; bulk density 0.53, 0.56 and 0.76; pH 6.4, 6.3 and 6.8; and dispersibility 59.2, 59.8 and 8.68 for samples A, B and R, respectively. Sample R (control) had the highest mean values for water binding capacity, pH, swelling power and bulk density while sample A had the highest mean value for solubility. Sample B had the lowest mean values for all the functional properties measured while Sample R (commercial yam fufu) was liked most in terms of aroma, taste, colour, mouldability and texture. From the results, sample A (80% bitter yam flour and 20% cassava starch) had relatively better sensory attributes than sample B (70% bitter yam flour and 30% cassava starch), as well as better functional properties. Keywords: bitter yam, cassava starch, bulk density, dispersibility, swelling power, Water Binding Capacity ...

Dr. Xue Wu ZHANG
Professor, South China University of Technology, 381 Wushan Road, Guangzhou 510640, People’s Republic of China

Dr. Yuan Soon Ho
Distinguished Professor/Director, Graduate Institute of Medical Science, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University

Prof. Dr. Mahmoud Abd-Allah Mohamed Saleh
Chief Researcher , Special Food & Nutrition, Dept., Food Technology Res. Inst (FTRI), Agric. Res. Center, (ARC), 9 El-Gamma st., Giza, Egypt

Dr. Khaled Saad Zaghloul Ali
Associate Professor, Faculty of Medicine, Pediatric Department, Assiut University

Dr. Jiban Shrestha
Scientist, Nepal Agricultural Research Council, National Maize Research Program, Rampur, Chitwan, Nepal

Dr. Vikas Kumar
Assistant Professor (Food Technology and Nutrition), School of Agriculture, Lovely Professional University

Dr. Majid Sharifi-Rad
Department of Range and Watershed Management, Faculty of Natural Resources, University of Zabol

Dr Rodney Alexandre Ferreira Rodrigues
Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Centro Pluridisciplinar de Pesquisas Químicas e Biológicas

Dr. Carolina Veronezi
Research Scientist & Teacher, University of the State of Minas Gerais – UEMG and Union of Great Lakes Colleges – UNILAGO

Dr. Pankaj Kumar Singh
Assistant Professor, Department of Animal Nutrition, Bihar Animal Sciences University

Dr. Guang Hao
Georgia Prevention Institute, Department of Population Health Sciences, Medical College of Georgia. Augusta University

Dr. Umar Farooq
Associate Professor, Department of Food Science and Technology, Muhammad Nawaz Shareef University of Agriculture

Dr. Ionel BONDOC
Associate Professor, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Iasi, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine Iasi (ROMANIA), Department of Public Health

Dr. Leqi Cui
Assistant Professor, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi, China

Dr. Heba Hassan Abd-El Azim Salama
Associate Professor, National Research Centre, Food Industries and Nutrition Division

Dr. Jong-Bang Eun
Professor, Department of Food Science and Technology, College of Agriculture and Life Science, Chonnam National University

Dr. Monica BUTNARIU
Professor, habilitated doctor, chemist, Chemistry & Biochemistry Discipline, Banat’s University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine “King Michael I of Romania” from Timisoara, 300645, Calea Aradului 119, Timis, Romania,

Dr. Victor Hugo Gomes Sales
Professor, Department of food technology, Instituto Federal do Amapá

Dr. Kamila Nascimento
PhD in Food Science and Technology – Federal Rural University of Rio de Janeiro – RJ, Brazil

Dr. Krešimir Mastanjević
Assistant Professor, Name and address of employer, Type of business or sector University in Osijek, Faculty of Food Technology, Franje Kuhača 20, 31000 Osijek, Croatia Science and higher education

Dr. Theophine Akunne
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Nigeria, Nsukka 410001, Nigeria

Dr Kasim S. Abass
Assistant Professor, College of Nursing, University of Kirkuk

Dr Zhuo Wang
The Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, PA

Dr. Sheikh Adil Hamid
Assistant Professor, Division of Livestock Production and Management, Faculty of Veterinary Sciences and Animal Husbandry

Dr Nishant P. Visavadiya
Biodesign Institute, Arizona State University, USA

Dr. Poliana Mendes de Souza
Federal University of Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri

Dr. Rajinder Pal Singh Bajwa
Niagara Falls Mem Med Center, Division of Infectious Diseases, 621 Tenth Street, Niagara Falls, NY 14301.

Dr. Subrota Hati
Assistant Professor, Dept. Dairy Microbiology, Anand Agricultural University

Dr. İlknur UCAK
Assistant Professor, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences and Technologies, Nigde Omer Halisdemir University

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1. Agustina Irazusta, Russell Caccavello, Luis Panizzolo, Alejandro Gugliucci, Alejandra Medrano. The potential use of Mentha x piperita L., Peumus boldus Mol. and Baccharis trimera Iless. extracts as functional food ingredients. International Journal of Food and Nutrition Research, 2018; 2:14. DOI: 10.28933/ijfnr-2018-09-1001 
2. Rabia Syed and Ying Wu.A review article on health benefits of Pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan (L.) Millsp). International Journal of Food and Nutrition Research, 2018; 2:15. DOI: 10.28933/ijfnr-2018-09-0301

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International journal of food and nutrition research

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