International Journal of Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation


PROGRESSIVE EXERCISE THERAPY IN MUSCLE DYSTROPHY: TWO CASE STUDIES IN ADULT PATIENTS WITH DM2 AND LGMD2D

Research Article of Internal Journal of Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation Progressive exercise therapy in muscle dystrophy: two case studies in adult patients with DM2 and LGMD2D Nico Nitzsche1*, Noah Augustin1, Michael Klotz1, Henry Schulz1 1Professorship of Sports Medicine/ Sports Biology, TU Chemnitz, Thüringer Weg 11, 09126 Chemnitz, Germany. These two case studies aimed to investigate the effect and acceptance of progressive strength training in patients with muscular dystrophy. Case 1 completed a progressive resistance exercise over 12 weeks. The results showed increases in leg extensor strength, hand strength and balance. Furthermore, the anaerobic test showed an increase in the maximum glycolysis rate. Creatine kinase levels were reduced while maintaining low muscle soreness. Case 2 conducted seven weeks of electronically assisted strength training and electromyostimulation. In the course of the training, an increase in the self-contribution of the performance in the execution of movement was observed in the assisted strength training. Furthermore, an increase in the intensity of external stimuli was observed. The creatine kinase showed a reduction with physiological behavior of muscle soreness. The results demonstrate the acceptance and feasibility of progressive exercise protocols used to increase performance in two cases of muscular dystrophy. Keywords: Muscle dystrophy; Resistance exercise; Exercise therapy; Muscle soreness; Creatine kinase ...

MEDIAL TIBIAL STRESS SYNDROME: THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN GENDER AND LOWER-EXTREMITY FUNCTIONAL PERFORMANCE AMONG COLLEGIATE TRACK AND FIELD ATHLETES

Research Article of Internal Journal of Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation Medial tibial stress syndrome: The relationship between gender and lower-extremity functional performance among collegiate track and field athletes Megan E. Sievers BA, Andrew M. Busch EdD, CSCS Ohio Wesleyan University. Medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is a common lower extremity injury in track and field athletes. Many risk factors are associated with MTSS, and lower extremity performance may become altered in athletes suffering from prior symptoms, potentially increasing risk of future injury. The purpose of this study was to first examine the effect a prior history of MTSS has on lower-extremity measures, per gender, in collegiate level track and field athletes, and then determine if such measures predict future injury. Fifty-three healthy Division III collegiate track and field athletes (mean age = 19.40 ± 1.13 years) completed an injury history questionnaire along with five preseason lower-extremity functional tests including: ankle dorsiflexion (DF), single-leg anterior reach (SLAR), two timed single-leg balance (SLBAL) tests on a force plate, and single-leg hop for distance (SLH). Performance data were compared across gender and questionnaire data regarding injury history and occurrence of MTSS. Fifteen subjects (28%) reported previous MTSS symptoms within the last 2 years. Chi-square analyses revealed females experienced more diagnoses compared to males (p = .03). Independent t-tests revealed differences between gender on all SLBAL tests, as males performed better on all recorded measures (p < .001 – p = .003). No significant differences were noted in lower-extremity performance tests between subjects with and without prior MTSS injuries. Regression analyses using postseason injury questionnaire data revealed prior MTSS injuries had 17.3 higher odds of experiencing MTSS during the season (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 17.33, 95% CI: 3.5 - 86.4; p = .001). Keywords: Center-of-pressure excursion; Force plate; Movement system; Y-balance test; Track ...

PHYSIOTHERAPISTS AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AT WORK AMONG IN BENIN AND FRANCE

Research Article of Internal Journal of Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation Physiotherapists and physical activity at work among in Benin and France ALAGNIDE HE, NIAMA NATTA D, AGBO OVE, DJIVOH Y, ASSOGBA F, SOGBOSSI E, DAHOUETO W, KPADONOU GT. University Clinic for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation/ CNHU-HKM (Cotonou/ Benin) Physical activity at work is an important indicator of the level of activity. Physiotherapists are one of professionals for the prevention against sedentary lifestyle. Objective: To assess the level of physical activity at work among physiotherapists in Benin and France. Method: Descriptive and analytical cross-sectional study, conducted from July 2017 to July 2018. With physiotherapists who consent to participate to this study we use a pedometer. They wear it at work for five consecutive days. The average number of daily steps at work was determined. Physiotherapist’s level of inactivity was assessed using the Baecke questionnaire. Data was analyzed using Epi Info 13.0. X2 of Pearson’s and ANOVA tests. They were used for the comparison of qualitative and quantitative variables respectively. Significance level was set at 0.05. Results: Among fifty-four physiotherapists evaluated, forty-four (81.5%) were sedentary, with a significant level of sedentary lifestyle in twenty-six cases (48.11%). This limitation of physical activity at the workplace and the level of sedentary lifestyle of the subjects were comparable among Beninese and French physiotherapists and they were not associated with any of the factors studied. Conclusion: The level of physical activity of physiotherapists at work is limited. Raising the awareness of these actors seems essential. Keywords:Physical activity at work, sedentary lifestyle, physiotherapy, Benin, France ...

THE COMPARISON OF THE SHOULDER MUSCLE ACTIVATION IN PATIENTS WITH ROTATOR CUFF TEAR UNDER AN ABDUCTION BRACE AMONG THE THREE POSTURES

Research Article of Internal Journal of Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation The comparison of the shoulder muscle activation in patients with rotator cuff tear under an abduction brace among the three postures Kazuya Okazawa1*, Naohide Takeuchi2, Naoya Kozono2, Kenichi Kawaguchi2, Sachie Noda1, Masayuki Kawaguchi1, Yasuharu Nakashima2 1Department of Rehabilitation, Kyushu University Hospital, Fukuo-ka, Japan. 2Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan. Background: Immobilization using an abduction brace is essential for the relaxation of the rotator cuff and scapular muscles and the prevention of a retear in patients with rotator cuff tear after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR). However, thus far, the comparison of the scapular muscle activities has not been compared among different postures under an abduction brace in patients after ARCR. Objectives: The purpose of our study was to compare the scapular muscle activities among the supine position, sitting position, and walking under an abduction brace before and after ARCR Study Design: Observational, repeated measures study. Methods: Twelve patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears were studied. The mean patient age was 64.7 years. The scapular muscle activations of the ipsilateral limbs were measured using surface electromyography in three postures: supine position, sitting position, and walking. The integrated electromyography relative values of the upper trapezius, anterior deltoid, middle deltoid, and biceps brachii were compared preoperatively and at two weeks after ARCR. Results: The trapezius, biceps brachii, and middle deltoid in the walking showed significantly higher integrated electromyography relative values than those in the supine position, preoperatively and at two weeks after surgery. The anterior deltoid in the sitting position had significantly higher integrated electromyography relative values than those in the supine position. Conclusions: Postures affected the scapular muscle activities in ARCR patients under an abduction brace. Understanding the influence of posture on the scapular muscle ...

Dr. John Caruso
Full Professor (Tenured), The University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, USA

Dr. Th. Nandalal Singh
Chairperson, Department of Physical Education, Panjab University, Chandigarh (UT)-160014, INDIA

Dr. Shyamal Koley
Professor & Head, Department of Physiotherapy, Guru Nanak Dev University

Dr Ferruh TASPINAR
Associate Professor, Department of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, School of Health Science, Dumlupinar University, Campus of Evliya Celebi, 43100, Kutahya, Turkey

Dr. Sardar Mohammadi
Associate Professor, Department of Sport Management. Faculty of P. E. & sport sciences, University of Kurdistan

Dr Ravindra Baliram Khandare
Director of physical Education, Mula Education Socity Art, Comm, Sci Collage Sonai.

Dr.Mohammed Nader
Department of Biological Sciences and Sports Health ,Faculty of Physical Education, Suez Canal University

Dr. Gul Baltaci
PT.Ph.D. Professor, FACSM, CKTI,Private Ankara Guven Hospital, Ankara Turkey 

Dr. Bogdan Constantin Ungurean
Alexandru Ioan Cuza University of IASI, ROMANIA

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1. Avinaba Mukherjee, Sourav Sikdar, Anisur Rahman Khuda-Bukhsh. Evaluation of ameliorative potential of isolated flavonol fractions from Thuja occidentalis in lung cancer cells and in Benzo(a) pyrene induced lung toxicity in mice. International Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine, 2016; 1(1): 0001-0013. 
2. Vikas Gupta, Parveen Bansal, Junaid Niazi, Kamlesh Kohli, Pankaj Ghaiye. Anti-anxiety Activity of Citrus paradisi var. duncan Extracts in Swiss Albino Mice-A Preclinical Study. Journal of Herbal Medicine Research, 2016; 1(1): 0001-0006.

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International Journal of Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation((ISSN:2637-5044; DOI:10.28933/IJSMR) is a peer reviewed open access journal publishing research manuscripts, review articles, editorials, letters to the editor in the area of Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation.

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International Journal of Sports Medicine and Rehabilitation

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