Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Among Female Qassim Region, Saudi Arabia


KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE, AND PRACTICE OF POLYCYSTIC OVARY SYNDROME AMONG FEMALE QASSIM REGION, SAUDI ARABIA


IBTISAM AYAD ALHARBI

Department of Medical Laboratories College of Applied Medical Sciences Qassim University, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.


Introduction: Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most endocrine disorders in young women during their reproductive years. PCOS is associated with the incidence of type 2 DM and infertility, which in turn increases the financial burden to healthcare system. The aim of this study is to determine the knowledge, attitude, and practice of polycystic ovary syndrome among female Qassim region.

Methods: An observational, cross-section study recruited young women age between 18 and 50 years from September 2019 to November 2019 in Al Qassim region. The data is obtained through an online survey that is posted in commonly used social media applications: namely, Instagram, Snapchat, Telegram, WhatsApp, and twitter. EPI INFO 7 is used to determine the association among demographical factors and knowledge, attitude, and practice of polycystic ovary syndrome.

Results: Over 400 participated women there is 84% have knowledge about PCOS, 73% know the correlation between PCOS and obesity, 46% know that PCOS is heredity. At the same time, 63% did not realize that PCOS can cause type 2 DM. Moreover, knowledge has a significant association with age, social status, and education level with P-value 0.003, 0.02, 0.018, respectively. In terms of prevalence, 22% of participants have PCOS, while 17% of their mother or sister has PCOS.

Conclusion: Knowledge of PCOS is a significant association with age, social status, and education level. To increase awareness of women related PCOS, these factors should keep in mind to produce an effective education program/campaign.


Keywords: Polycystic ovarian syndrome; Knowledge; Attitude; Practice; Qassim region

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How to cite this article:
IBTISAM AYAD ALHARBI.KNOWLEDGE, ATTITUDE, AND PRACTICE OF POLYCYSTIC OVARY SYNDROME AMONG FEMALE QASSIM REGION, SAUDI ARABIA.International Research Journal of Public Health, 2020; 4:48. DOI: 10.28933/irjph-2020-10-1305


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