Teachers’ Knowledge, Attitude and Practices of Differentiated Instruction: The Case of Department of Educational Planning and Management Faculty of Education University of Gondar


Teachers’ Knowledge, Attitude and Practices of Differentiated Instruction: The Case of Department of Educational Planning and Management Faculty of Education University of Gondar


Addis Tsegaye Zegeye

Department of Teacher Education and Curriculum Studies, College of Education & Behavioral Sciences, Bahir Dar University


Open Journal of Language and Linguistics

Students’ populations are becoming more academically diverse due to ever increasing variety of learners in the heterogeneous classroom make-up. Effective teachers in contemporary classrooms have to learn to develop classroom routines that attend to learner variance in order to raise students’ achievement. Teachers need to focus on using sound instructional practices that will improve students’ performance for all types of learners. The purpose of the study was to investigate the teachers’ knowledge, attitude and practice of differentiated instruction in the case of faculty of education in the department of Educational Planning and Management (EdPM) at University of Gondar(UoG). The study employed qualitative research method with case study design which was used to answer the research questions raised. The research participants were dean of the faculty of education, the department head of EdPM and teachers at UoG. The participants were purposively selected. Interview and Focus Group Discussion were used to collect data. The data obtained were analyzed and interpreted using qualitative description and narration .The results of the analysis showed that teachers have positive attitude towards Differentiated Instruction (DI). However, the elements of DI were not properly practiced yet as expected for a number of reasons. It was then concluded that the prevailing practice of DI was poor. In addition to this, the trend of using the lecture method frequently and assessing students based on examinations as mere modes of teaching and assessment were emphasized at the faculty. To overcome this, it was suggested that the current mode of teaching which focuses on traditional lecture method should be changed. Moreover, the actual context of the faculty and its influence on the teaching learning process should be given due attention


Keywords: Teachers’ Knowledge, Attitude, Differentiated Instruction

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How to cite this article:
Addis Tsegaye Zegeye.Teachers’ Knowledge, Attitude and Practices of Differentiated Instruction: The Case of Department of Educational Planning and Management Faculty of Education University of Gondar.Open Journal of Language and Linguistics, 2019, 2:9


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