IJCR (2021), Volume 5

  • Intestinal anastomosis blowout following post-operative cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A case report

    Background: Pneumoperitoneum following cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a very rare complication with a challenging management. In this paper we describe the management of a patient who suffered a blowout of his colorectal anastomosis after undergoing CPR for a cardiac arrest in the early post-operative period. Additionally, we present a thorough literature review of the management of CPR-related pneumoperitoneum. Summary: Five days after a sigmoid resection for colon cancer, a 71-year-old male went into pulseless electrical activity and CPR was initiated, with complete clinical recovery. After CPR the patient was found to have new hydropneumothorax and pneumoperitoneum. Because he had a normal abdominal examination, lack of leukocytosis, and no evidence of a bowel perforation on water-soluble CT imaging, the patient was initially managed non-operatively with close clinical follow-up. However, he failed the non-operative management and ultimately required a laparotomy demonstrating a blowout of his colonic anastomosis. Conclusion: Physicians should remain aware of the risk of damage to fresh bowel anastomoses following CPR. There should be a low threshold for surgical exploration in patients that develop CPR-related pneumoperitoneum soon after intestinal surgery, even when patient’s clinical status is stable.

  • Post Appendectomy Blindness, Extremely rare complication after abdominal surgery

    Perioperative visual loss (POVL) is a drastic complication that can result after ocular and more commonly non-ocular surgery, mostly reported after spine and cardiac bypass procedures. Despite the rarity of such complication, it has been reported following the abdominal surgeries. Overall, the most common cause of POVL is ischemic optic neuropathy but any pathology to the optical system from the cornea to the occipital lobe can lead to this rare phenomenon. Here, we are reporting the second case in the literature of post-operative visual loss after laparoscopic appendectomy. A young female, with no underlying disease, underwent laparoscopic appendectomy after septic shock secondary to acute appendicitis. Postoperatively, patient complained of complete blindness after extubation. Neurologic examination revealed bilateral near complete blindness, and hemodynamic ischemic stroke in the occipital cortex.

  • Idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis and ankylosing spondylitis – A new case report with review of the literature

    Retroperitoneal fibrosis (RPF) is an uncommon disease (annual incidence estimated at 1/20,000–500,000) characterized by the development of dense fibrous tissue in the retroperitoneal compartment [1]. RPF can be idiopathic or secondary to drugs, infections, radiotherapy, malignant diseases, major abdominal surgery, trauma and retroperitoneal injuries [2,3]. RPF has also been reported in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases including rheumatic diseases [4-7]. Several cases of RPF in patients with ankylosing spondylitis have been described. Herein, we report a new case of retroperitoneal fibrosis in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis.

  • Intra-Abdominal Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor: A Diagnostic Dilemma In Resource-Constrained Settings

    Introduction. Desmoplastic small round-cell tumours (DSRCT) are primarily intra-abdominal soft tissue sarcomas that are extremely rare and aggressive with a rapidly deteriorating clinical course and poor outcome despite therapy. It belongs to the family of small round blue-cell tumours, symptoms of the disease are non-specific and metastasis is often present at diagnosis. Objective. This report presents a typical case of an intra-abdominal DSRCT while highlighting how challenging the diagnosis can be in resource-poor settings and best-practice in the management of its attendant complications. Case presentation. This is a case 10-year-old boy who presented with a two-month history of weight loss and a two-week history of colicky abdominal pain, abdominal distension and vomiting and loss of appetite. He was pale, had left mandibular lymphadenopathy with a distended abdomen and ascites. A palpable mass was occluding ~80% of his rectal lumen. CT scan showed intra-abdominal masses in the rectovesical pouch and hepatic flexure with abdominopelvic lymphadenopathy Patient was worked up for exploratory laparotomy, colostomy placement and tumor biopsy, with the subsequent histology and immunohistochemistry a diagnosis of DSRCT was made. The patient developed moderate anaemia, acute kidney injury, hypertension and anarsarca while on admission; these were successfully managed with blood transfusions, intravenous fluids and drugs subsequently. He had a re-exploration for fecal disimpaction and adhesiolysis due to persistent intestinal obstruction. Patient was discharged 15 days after admissionin a stable clinical state. Conclusion. Desmoplastic round-cell tumour (DSRCT) primarily occurr within the abdomen, it is capable of mimicking the symptomatology of other intra-abdominal malignancies and a high index of suspicion is requisite to make a diagnosis especially in resource-poor settings with swift implementation of treatment modalities necessary to halt disease progress.

  • Unilateral Vestibular schwannoma with Pituitary macroadenoma- Rare concurrent dual intracranial lesion

    The presenting clinic features of the cerebellopontine angle tumours and their management are well known, however there is limited knowledge regarding coexistence of other primary brain tumours which can be incidentally detected. A 70-year-old otherwise normal gentleman was referred from routine hearing screening programme centre with more of right sided hearing loss and occasional right sided tinnitus. Pure tone audiogram revealed an asymmetric high frequency sensorineural hearing loss .Gadolinium contrast enhanced MRI showed a right distal mass filling the entire internal acoustic meatus with an intracanalicular dural extension indenting the middle cerebellar peduncle with no significant enhancement. Additionally, an incidental enhancing asymmetric macroadenoma was detected in the pituitary sella indenting the left cavernous sinus without an extension and displacing the pituitary stalk to the right and displacing the carotids superiorly exerting insignificant pressure on the optic nerves. He had Hyperprolactinemia but normal visual fields. Here we present this rare concurrent presentation of dual intracranial primary tumours which by itself clinically is very uncommon.