International Journal of Case Reports


Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia/Acquired Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura as a first presentation of pancreatic cancer

Case Report of International Journal of Case Reports Microangiopathic hemolytic anemia/Acquired Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura as a first presentation of pancreatic cancer Meshaal Alanzi1, Khalid E. Ahmed1, Bassel Dakkak1, Mohammed B. Habib1, Ahmed O. Saleh2, Mohamed A. Yassin3, Shehab F. Mohamed3 1.Department of Internal Medicine, Hamad medical corporation, Doha, Qatar;2.Department of Endocrinology, Hamad medical corporation, Doha, Qatar; 3.Department of Hematology, National center for cancer care and research, Hamad medical corporation, Doha, Qatar. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a rare life-threatening hematologic disorder. It is mainly characterized by thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA), fever, renal impairment and neurological abnormality. Plasmapheresis and steroids are the standard of care. MAHA/TTP can be the initial presentation of solid organ malignancies especially gastrointestinal tumors. We report a 56-year-old female patient who presented with progressive back pain, tiredness, easy bruising, fever and weight loss. Laboratory results showed anemia, thrombocytopenia, and schistocytes in the peripheral smear. An initial diagnosis of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) was made on the basis of clinical presentation and lab findings. She was treated with corticosteroids and plasma exchange but with no major response. CT abdomen and PET CT were suggestive of pancreatic carcinoma with extensive lymph nodal, organs and bone metastases. Supraclavicular lymph node biopsy was compatible with metastatic adenocarcinoma. As a result, the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer was established and the decision was for palliative treatment. This case highlights the need to consider malignancy in patients with MAHA/TTP especially if it does not respond to plasmapheresis. Hence, the treatment of MAHA/TTP could be directed to the underlying malignancy if available. Keywords: TTP, pancreatic cancer, plasmapheresis ...

Oral Lesion like Mucous Membrane Pemphigoid under Carboplatin-induced Hemolytic Anemia and Pancytopenia as Hypersensitive Reactions in a case with Maxillary Sinus Cancer: A Case Report

Case Report of International Journal of Case Reports Oral Lesion like Mucous Membrane Pemphigoid under Carboplatin-induced Hemolytic Anemia and Pancytopenia as Hypersensitive Reactions in a case with Maxillary Sinus Cancer: A Case Report Yuki Hokita, DH1,  Kazuyo Mori, DH1,  Taihei Yamaguchi, DDS2*, Takahiko Oho, DDS2 1Section of Oral Hygiene,  Kagoshima University Hospital,  Kagoshima,  Japan; 2Department of Preventive Dentistry,  Research Field in Dentistry,  Medical and Dental Sciences Area,  Kagoshima University,  Kagoshima,  Japan Here we report the first case of fatal carboplatin induced immune hemolytic anemia in a patient with head and neck malignant neoplasms followed by onset of multi-organ failure. While carboplatin is an effective agent used to treat many kinds of malignant tumorigenic lesion, a number of reports about allergic side effects are present. A 64-year-old male patient diagnosed as maxillary sinus cancer was treated by radiation therapy associated with weekly intravenous infusions of carboplatin. After five times of carboplatin infusion, white blood cell and platelet counts and hemoglobin value gradually decreased, and reached to almost bottom level. Both direct and indirect coombs tests were negative. Reticulocyte count and the value of platelet-associated IgG were high level, and oral lesion-like mucous membrane pemphigoid appeared on tongue and hard plate. Recognition of the particular oral abnormality in the early stage could allow for correct diagnosis and a potentially effective therapy. Funding: This study was supported in part by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 18K09885. Keywords: hypersensitivity, carboplatin, pemphigoid, maxillary sinus cancer, chemotherapy ...

Invasive Haemophilus influenzae disease in Northwestern Ontario First Nations communities: Case Series

Case Report of International Journal of Case Reports Invasive Haemophilus influenzae disease in Northwestern Ontario First Nations communities: Case Series Chelsea J. Kubinec MSci1, Len Kelly MD MClinSci2, Sarah Byce MD, MSci1, Raymond S.W. Tsang MMedSc PhD3, Marina Ulanova MD PhD4 1Medical Student, Northern Ontario School of Medicine, Thunder Bay, Ontario; 2Sioux Lookout Meno Ya Win Health Centre, Sioux Lookout, Ontario; 3Vaccine Preventable Bacterial Diseases, National Microbiology Laboratory, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, Manitoba; 4Division of Medical Sciences, Northern Ontario School of Medicine, Thunder Bay, Ontario We present clinical and microbiological data of 5 pediatric cases of invasive Haemophilus influenzae disease, which occurred over a period of 10 months in the service area of a regional hospital of Northwestern Ontario. Four cases of invasive H. influenzae type a (Hia) disease presented either as meningitis, non-complicated and complicated pneumonia, or soft tissue infection in children between 7 months and 6 years of age. Although the cases were from different communities with no known common exposure, the Hia isolates demonstrated similar phenotypic and genotypic characteristics. One case of invasive disease due to nontypeable H. influenzae (NTHi) presented as chorioamnionitis in an adolescent. The data emphasize the significance of Hia and NTHi as a cause of serious disease in Indigenous communities. Keywords: Haemophilus influenzae, invasive disease, First Nations communities This study was supported by the Canadian Immunization Research Network (CIRN) ...

Sclerosing angiomatoid nodular transformation of the spleen: an unusual cause of abdominal pain

Case Report of International Journal of Case Reports Sclerosing angiomatoid nodular transformation of the spleen: an unusual cause of abdominal pain Hussien Aly Touny, Einas Al Kuwari, Ahmed Al Moudaris, Salahddin Gehani Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha, Qatar Vascular neoplasms are the most common primary nonhematopoietic tumors of the spleen. They include hemangiomas, littoral cell angiomas, splenic hamartomas, lymphangiomas, hemangioendotheliomas, angiosarcomas, and Sclerosing Angiomatoid Nodular Transformation (SANT)1. SANT is a rare and benign lesion arising from the red pulp of the spleen 2.Martel et al first described the disease entity in 2004 in middle aged- adults with slight female preponderance , the etiology and pathogenesis are still not clear3, SANT poses diagnostic clinical and radiological challenges4, we present this case report with review of the literature. Keywords: Sclerosing angiomatoid nodular transformation,  spleen, cause of abdominal pain ...

Colo-renal fistula following percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of a renal tumor. A case report and review of treatment options

Case Report of International Journal of Case Reports Colo-renal fistula following percutaneous radiofrequency ablation of a renal tumor. A case report and review of treatment options Allan Stolarski, MD1,2, Joanna Wang, MD1,2, Katherine He, MD1,3, Lori Lerner, MD1,2, Gentian Kristo, MD1,3 1Department of Surgery, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA; 2Department of Surgery, Boston Medical Center, Boston University Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 3Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Background:  Colo-renal fistula formation is a very rare complication following percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the management of renal cell carcinoma. In this paper we describe the management of a patient with a left colo-renal fistula occurring after renal tumor RFA. Additionally, we present a thorough literature review of reported cases of colo-renal fistulae after percutaneous RFA to further highlight their treatment challenges. Summary:  Two weeks after undergoing percutaneous RFA of an incidental 3cm left renal mass, a 67-year-old male was re-admitted to the hospital with a symptomatic colo-renal fistula.  Patient ultimately failed conservative management with broad spectrum antibiotics and ureteral stent placements, and subsequently underwent segmental colonic resection and renorrhaphy, with complete renal preservation. Conclusion: Although complications after RFA of renal tumors are rare, iatrogenic colo-renal fistula formation is a significant complication requiring a multi-disciplinary approach with a trial of non-operative management prior to surgical intervention. Keywords: renal cancer; radiofrequency ablation, colorenal fistula ...

Dr. Xiaoning Luo
Professor, Department of Otorhinolarygology-Head and Neck Surgery, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou, China

Dr. N.S. NEKI
Professor & Head, Dept.of Medicine, Govt. Medical College, Amritsar, India

Dr. Jitesh K. Kar
Clinical assistant professor, Department of Internal Medicine – Neurology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Huntsville Regional Campus

Dr. Nisar Haider Zaidi
MBBS, MS, MRCS (Glasgow), FICS, FACS. Department of surgery, King Abdulaziz University Hospital , POBox-80215 Jeddah 21589 , Saudi Arabia

Dr. Giuseppe Lanza
Consultant Neurologist and Clinical Researcher, Department of Neurology IC of the “Oasi” Institute for Research on Mental Retardation and Brain Aging

Dr. Yousif Mohamed Y. Abdallah
Professor (Assistant), Radiological Science and Medical Imaging Department, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Majmaah University, Majmaah, Saudi Arabia

Dr. Karol Szyluk
District Hospital of Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery

Dr. Mohd Normani Zakaria
Chairman / Head of Hospital Unit / Assistant Professor / Consultant Audiologist, Audiology and Speech Pathology Programme, School of Health Sciences,, Universiti Sains Malaysia 

Dr. Dennis J. Mazur
Senior Scholar, Center for Ethics in Health Care, and Professor of Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon USA

Dr. Marcos Roberto Tovani Palone
Department of Pathology and Legal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil.

Dr. Begum Sertyesilisik
Assoc. Prof. at the Istanbul Technical University

Dr. Jamunarani Veeraraghavan
Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, Texas 

Dr. Rajinder Pal Singh Bajwa
Niagara Falls Mem Med Center, Division of Infectious Diseases, 621 Tenth Street, Niagara Falls, NY

Dr. Can SARICA
Adiyaman University School Of Medicine, Department Of Neurosurgery, Adiyaman

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1. Avinaba Mukherjee, Sourav Sikdar, Anisur Rahman Khuda-Bukhsh. Evaluation of ameliorative potential of isolated flavonol fractions from Thuja occidentalis in lung cancer cells and in Benzo(a) pyrene induced lung toxicity in mice. International Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine, 2016; 1(1): 0001-0013. 
2. Vikas Gupta, Parveen Bansal, Junaid Niazi, Kamlesh Kohli, Pankaj Ghaiye. Anti-anxiety Activity of Citrus paradisi var. duncan Extracts in Swiss Albino Mice-A Preclinical Study. Journal of Herbal Medicine Research, 2016; 1(1): 0001-0006.

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Aims
International Journal of Case Reports (ISSN:2572-8776; DOI:10.28933/IJCR) is a peer reviewed open access journal publishing case reports in all kinds of diseases of all medical fields. Our aim is to provide a platform for authors from all countries to encourages publication of most recent case reports in all specialties. 

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Peer Review help ensure the quality of the publications. Manuscripts of International Journal of Case Reports will be peer-reviewed by invited experts in the field. The decisions of editors will be made based on the comments of the reviewers.

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International Journal of Case Reports (ISSN:2572-8776; DOI:10.28933/IJCR) is a journal to support Open Access initiative

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Scope: (Case reports from all medical fields.)

  • Allergy and Its Subspecialties
  • Anesthesiology and Its Subspecialties
  • Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and Its Subspecialties
  • Urology and Its Subspecialties
  • Emergency Medicine and Its Subspecialties
  • Dermatology and Its Subspecialties
  • Medical Genetics and Its Subspecialties
  • Internal Medicine and Its Subspecialties
  • Diagnostic Radiology and Its Subspecialties
  • Neurology and Its Subspecialties
  • Psychiatry and Its Subspecialties
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology and Its Subspecialties
  • Ophthalmology and Its Subspecialties
  • Surgery and Its Subspecialties
  • Pediatrics and Its Subspecialties
  • Nuclear Medicine and Its Subspecialties
  • Preventive Medicine and Its Subspecialties
  • Radiation Oncology and Its Subspecialties
  • Pathology and Its Subspecialties
  • Family Medicine and Its Subspecialties
  • Immunology and Its Subspecialties

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