International Journal of Case Reports


Autologous Tenocyte Implantation (ATI) and the Use of Collagen Scaffolds: a Case Report of a Novel Surgical Treatment for Gluteal Tendon Repair

Case Report of International Journal of Case Reports Autologous Tenocyte Implantation (ATI) and the Use of Collagen Scaffolds: a Case Report of a Novel Surgical Treatment for Gluteal Tendon Repair John M O’Donnell1,2, Rowan Flanagan3, Jane Fitzpatrick4,5 1Hip Arthroscopy Australia, Richmond, Australia; 2Swinburne University, Melbourne, Australia; 3The Northern Hospital, Melbourne, Australia; 4Centre for Health and Exercise Sports Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Melbourne, Australia; 5Joint Health Institute Ltd, Melbourne, Australia Background: Ortho-biological therapies such as platelet-rich plasma and autologous tenocyte implantation injections are hypothesized to introduce cellular mediators such as growth factors into tendons, promoting natural healing. Methods: This case introduces a 63-year-old female with an extensive history of lateral hip pain and treatment refractory tendinopathy with tearing. She underwent open surgery to repair the gluteus medius tendon, using supplementary autologous tenocyte implantation (ATI) in conjunction with a Celgro (Orthocell, Perth, Australia) collagen scaffold. Level of evidence: 4 Results: She had normal function in the hip at 12 months. MRI scans post-operatively at 12 months showed a marked reduction in inflammation, an intact tendon and a reduction in atrophic changes in the muscle belly. Conclusion: Surgical repair of a large degenerate tear of the gluteus medius tendon, augmented with autologous tenocyte implantation in a collagen scaffold led to an excellent patient outcome and MRI findings demonstrated tendon healing with improved tendon structure and reduced inflammation. Keywords: Lateral hip pain, gluteal tendinopathy, greater trochanteric pain syndrome, autologous tenocyte implantation, collagen scaffold ...

Virus transmission through fragmented flight in cooked meat fumes at more than 10 meters of distance, a case report with SARS-CoV2 / COVID19

Case Report of International Journal of Case Reports Virus transmission through fragmented flight in cooked meat fumes at more than 10 meters of distance, a case report with SARS-CoV2 / COVID19 Florent Pirot Independent researcher Meat is a known virus carrier and its ability to spread viruses is shown here in a different way. Meat fumes from a cooking process carrying a virus led to indirect contamination. Keywords: Virus transmission; fragmented flight; cooked meat fumes; SARS-CoV2 / COVID19 ...

Extra-synovial Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis of the knee joint, Case Repor

Case Report of International Journal of Case Reports Extra-synovial Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis of the knee joint, Case Repor Rebar Mohammed Noori, Musaab Mohammed Hazim* Department of Orthopedic Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Sulaimaniya, Iraq. Background: PVNS is a rare, benign & aggressive disorder arising from either synovial joints or tendon sheaths; it may erode articular structures and bones. We present a case with unique features of PVNS being extra-synovial and by this report we open a gate for more researches in this field. Case Presentation: This case report concerns a 35-year-old female with a history of right knee pain for 6-month duration proceeded by gradual swelling over posterior aspect of the knee, she denies any history of trauma, clinical examination was unremarkable but apart from tenderness over the infrapatellar region with full flexion. MRI shows a heterogenous signal extra-articular and extra-synovial lesion in posterior aspect of the knee suggesting Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis, FNA revealed a hemosiderin-laden macrophages and multinucleated giant cells, Tru-cut biopsy result was suggesting PVNS as synovial cells were seen admixed with hemosiderin-laden macrophages with fibroblastic elements. Through posterior approach; the lesion was surgically excised and histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis, the lesion was recurrent after 1-year and MRI revealed the same features, the lesion was excised by arthroscopic intervention. Conclusion: We concluded that PVNS cannot be excluded when extra-synovial lesion is assessed, and further researches on this topic will expand our understanding of the etiological and pathological aspects of this tumor. Keywords: Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis, Giant Cell Tumor, Knee, Synovitis, Benign tumor ...

Identification of Interictal Paroxysmal Diffuse Sharp Activity with Eye Closure in Patients with Generalized Epilepsy

Case Report of International Journal of Case Reports Identification of Interictal Paroxysmal Diffuse Sharp Activity with Eye Closure in Patients with Generalized Epilepsy Mary Payne, MD*, Mary Miller RPSSGT, RST, R.NCS.T, CNCT, R.EEG.T Marshall University, Cabell Huntington Hospital. Interictal EEG recordings of patients with generalized epilepsy have known interictal abnormalities such as generalized spike and wave activity during photic stimulation and hyperventilation, interictal spike and wave or diffuse sharp activity [1]. We report three patients with confirmed generalized epilepsy who’s interictal recordings showed paroxysmal diffuse sharp 10 Hz activity in all leads with eye closure following eye blinking. This pattern was not associated with interictal generalized spike and wave activity, clinical change in the patient or did not follow seizure activity. Abnormal eye movement with generalized spike and wave activity has been described in Jeavon’s syndrome, eyelid myotonia and Sunflower syndrome. However, our patients did not meet criteria for any of these diagnoses. Therefore, we feel that our finding of paroxysmal diffuse sharp alpha activity is a novel finding in these patients with primary generalized epilepsy and may be a newly reported marker for patients with primary generalized epilepsy. Recognition of PDSA activity and further study of this pattern is encouraged. Keywords: Interictal Paroxysmal Diffuse Sharp Activity; Interictal EEG ...

Intestinal anastomosis blowout following post-operative cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A case report

Case Report of International Journal of Case Reports Intestinal anastomosis blowout following post-operative cardiopulmonary resuscitation: A case report Olivia A. Sacks, MD1,2, Priyanka Chugh, MD1,2, Katherine He, MD1,3, Allan Stolarski, MD1,2, Gentian Kristo, MD1,3* 1Department of Surgery, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA; 2Department of Sur¬gery, Boston Medical Center, Boston University Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; 3Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Background: Pneumoperitoneum following cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a very rare complication with a challenging management. In this paper we describe the management of a patient who suffered a blowout of his colorectal anastomosis after undergoing CPR for a cardiac arrest in the early post-operative period. Additionally, we present a thorough literature review of the management of CPR-related pneumoperitoneum. Summary: Five days after a sigmoid resection for colon cancer, a 71-year-old male went into pulseless electrical activity and CPR was initiated, with complete clinical recovery. After CPR the patient was found to have new hydropneumothorax and pneumoperitoneum. Because he had a normal abdominal examination, lack of leukocytosis, and no evidence of a bowel perforation on water-soluble CT imaging, the patient was initially managed non-operatively with close clinical follow-up. However, he failed the non-operative management and ultimately required a laparotomy demonstrating a blowout of his colonic anastomosis. Conclusion: Physicians should remain aware of the risk of damage to fresh bowel anastomoses following CPR. There should be a low threshold for surgical exploration in patients that develop CPR-related pneumoperitoneum soon after intestinal surgery, even when patient’s clinical status is stable. Keywords: Pneumoperitoneum; Cardiopulmonary resuscitation; Bowel surgery; Anastomotic leak ...

Dr. Xiaoning Luo
Professor, Department of Otorhinolarygology-Head and Neck Surgery, Guangdong General Hospital, Guangzhou, China

Dr. N.S. NEKI
Professor & Head, Dept.of Medicine, Govt. Medical College, Amritsar, India

Dr. Jitesh K. Kar
Clinical assistant professor, Department of Internal Medicine – Neurology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Huntsville Regional Campus

Dr. Nisar Haider Zaidi
MBBS, MS, MRCS (Glasgow), FICS, FACS. Department of surgery, King Abdulaziz University Hospital , POBox-80215 Jeddah 21589 , Saudi Arabia

Dr. Giuseppe Lanza
Consultant Neurologist and Clinical Researcher, Department of Neurology IC of the “Oasi” Institute for Research on Mental Retardation and Brain Aging

Dr. Yousif Mohamed Y. Abdallah
Professor (Assistant), Radiological Science and Medical Imaging Department, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Majmaah University, Majmaah, Saudi Arabia

Dr. Karol Szyluk
District Hospital of Orthopedics and Trauma Surgery

Dr. Mohd Normani Zakaria
Chairman / Head of Hospital Unit / Assistant Professor / Consultant Audiologist, Audiology and Speech Pathology Programme, School of Health Sciences,, Universiti Sains Malaysia 

Dr. Dennis J. Mazur
Senior Scholar, Center for Ethics in Health Care, and Professor of Medicine, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon USA

Dr. Marcos Roberto Tovani Palone
Department of Pathology and Legal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil.

Dr. Begum Sertyesilisik
Assoc. Prof. at the Istanbul Technical University

Dr. Jamunarani Veeraraghavan
Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, Texas 

Dr. Rajinder Pal Singh Bajwa
Niagara Falls Mem Med Center, Division of Infectious Diseases, 621 Tenth Street, Niagara Falls, NY

Dr. Can SARICA
Adiyaman University School Of Medicine, Department Of Neurosurgery, Adiyaman

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1. Avinaba Mukherjee, Sourav Sikdar, Anisur Rahman Khuda-Bukhsh. Evaluation of ameliorative potential of isolated flavonol fractions from Thuja occidentalis in lung cancer cells and in Benzo(a) pyrene induced lung toxicity in mice. International Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine, 2016; 1(1): 0001-0013. 
2. Vikas Gupta, Parveen Bansal, Junaid Niazi, Kamlesh Kohli, Pankaj Ghaiye. Anti-anxiety Activity of Citrus paradisi var. duncan Extracts in Swiss Albino Mice-A Preclinical Study. Journal of Herbal Medicine Research, 2016; 1(1): 0001-0006.

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Aims
International Journal of Case Reports (ISSN:2572-8776; DOI:10.28933/IJCR) is a peer reviewed open access journal publishing case reports in all kinds of diseases of all medical fields. Our aim is to provide a platform for authors from all countries to encourages publication of most recent case reports in all specialties. 

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Peer Review help ensure the quality of the publications. Manuscripts of International Journal of Case Reports will be peer-reviewed by invited experts in the field. The decisions of editors will be made based on the comments of the reviewers.

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International Journal of Case Reports (ISSN:2572-8776; DOI:10.28933/IJCR) is a journal to support Open Access initiative

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Scope: (Case reports from all medical fields.)

  • Allergy and Its Subspecialties
  • Anesthesiology and Its Subspecialties
  • Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and Its Subspecialties
  • Urology and Its Subspecialties
  • Emergency Medicine and Its Subspecialties
  • Dermatology and Its Subspecialties
  • Medical Genetics and Its Subspecialties
  • Internal Medicine and Its Subspecialties
  • Diagnostic Radiology and Its Subspecialties
  • Neurology and Its Subspecialties
  • Psychiatry and Its Subspecialties
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology and Its Subspecialties
  • Ophthalmology and Its Subspecialties
  • Surgery and Its Subspecialties
  • Pediatrics and Its Subspecialties
  • Nuclear Medicine and Its Subspecialties
  • Preventive Medicine and Its Subspecialties
  • Radiation Oncology and Its Subspecialties
  • Pathology and Its Subspecialties
  • Family Medicine and Its Subspecialties
  • Immunology and Its Subspecialties

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