International Journal of Hospital Pharmacy


Nimesulide-induced Fixed Drug Eruption

Research Article of International Journal of Hospital Pharmacy Nimesulide-induced Fixed Drug Eruption T.V.Harsha Varun and R.E.Ugandhar Santhiram College of Pharmacy, Nandyal, Kurnool Dt, Andhra Pradesh Nimesulide is a cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor with a high degree of selectivity to COX-2. Nimesulide is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent with antipyretic and analgesic properties. It is being commonly prescribed in India.[1] Some of the side effects reported with its use are Pruritus, urticaria, purpura, maculopapular rash and localized toxic pustuloderma.[2],[3] Due to severe hepatotoxicity and hemolytic anemia associated with its use, Nimesulide is likely to be withdrawn from the market in many countries. Case report: The authors report a case of a patient with a history of antihistamine hypersensitivity that developed a bullous form of pigmented fixed drug eruption after Nimesulide. Patch tests performed on residual skin lesion were positive to Nimesulide, confirming that this was the culprit drug. Keywords: Drug eruption, Fixed drug eruption, Lesion patch testing, Nimesulide, Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs ...

A Comprehensive Review of Clinical Pharmacists in Chronic Care Management

Review Article of International Journal of Hospital Pharmacy A Comprehensive Review of Clinical Pharmacists in Chronic Care Management Abdul Kader Mohiuddin Dr. M. Nasirullah Memorial Trust, Tejgaon, Dhaka Pharmacy practice has changed substantially in recent years. The professionals have the opportunity to contribute directly to patient care in order to reduce morbimortality related to medication use, promoting health and preventing diseases. Healthcare organizations worldwide are under substantial pressure from increasing patient demand. Unfortunately, a cure is not always possible particularly in this era of chronic diseases, and the role of physicians has become limited to controlling and palliating symptoms. The increasing population of patients with long-term conditions are associated with high levels of morbidity, healthcare costs and GP workloads. Clinical pharmacy took over an aspect of medical care that had been partially abandoned by physicians. Overburdened by patient loads and the explosion of new drugs, physicians turned to pharmacists more and more for drug information, especially within institutional settings. Once relegated to counting and pouring, pharmacists headed institutional reviews of drug utilization and served as consultants to all types of health-care facilities. In addition, when clinical pharmacists are active members of the care team, they enhance efficiency by: Providing critical input on medication use and dosing. Working with patients to solve problems with their medications and improve adherence. Keywords: Chronic care; pharmacy intervention; diabetes care; CVD prevention; inflammatory bowel disease ...

Healthcare professionals’ awareness towards drug-drug interaction in Ayder comprehensive specialized hospital Mekelle, Ethiopia

Research Article of International Journal of Hospital Pharmacy Healthcare professionals’ awareness towards drug-drug interaction in Ayder comprehensive specialized hospital Mekelle, Ethiopia Betelhem Endal1, Desalegn Getnet2, Desye Gebrie1 1.Pharmacoepidemiology and Social Pharmacy Course and Research Team, School of Pharmacy, College of Health Science, Mekelle University, Mekelle, Ethiopia; 2.Pharmacology and Toxicology Course and Research Team, Department of Pharmacy, Adigrat University, Adigrat, Ethiopia Background: Healthcare professionals are the most responsible body to identify potential interaction of drugs that are prescribed as well as those that the patient may be self-administering. However, awareness of healthcare professionals towards drug-drug interaction is poor. So to improve patient medication safety, it is important to assess healthcare professionals’ knowledge pertaining to drug-drug interactions and common drug-drug interactions information sources. Method: Cross-sectional study design was employed. Self-administered questionnaire was prepared to assess healthcare professionals’ knowledge of drug-drug interactions and usual sources of drug-drug interaction information. Participants were asked to classify 10 drug pairs as ‘contraindicated’, ‘can be used with monitoring’, ‘no interaction’ and ‘not sure’. Study was conducted from November 2017 to June 2018. Participants were selected using simple random sampling method. Data were analyzed using statistical software, SPSS for windows version 20. The relationship between knowledge and independent variables (age, sex, profession, work experience, training, familiarity with standard treatment guideline perception and source of information) was assessed using binary logistic regression analysis (Crude and adjusted Odds ratio, 95% confidence interval). Result: The study was done by enrolling 293 healthcare professionals among whom 46 were Physician, 31 Pharmacist, and 216 Nurses. Over all, healthcare professionals in Ayder Comprehensive Specialized Hospital had low score (24.29%) knowledge of drug-drug interactions. However, among the healthcare professionals pharmacists had good drug-drug interactions knowledge than physicians and nurses with an average score of 32.87%, 21.06% and 18.96% respectively. Drug reference books were the most ...

An observation cross sectional study to assess the prevalence of micro vascular complications in diabetes

Research Article of International Journal of Hospital Pharmacy An observation cross sectional study to assess the prevalence of micro vascular complications in diabetes Nishad Unissa, Mariya Mahveen, Shiva Kumar, Katla. Swapna Department of Pharma.D, Bharat Institute of Technology-Pharmacy, Mangalpally, Ibrahimpatnam, KIMS, Telangana 501510, India. Diabetes mellitus is the commonest metabolic disorder and has a high prevalence in India. The prognosis of the diabetic patients largely depends on the complications seen in the natural course of illness. It was decided to undertake observational study to record various complications and the influence of various risk factors.(1) Diabetes mellitus is a long term metabolic disorder that is characterized by high blood sugar, insulin resistance, and relative lack of insulin.(2) Diabetes is a syndrome characterised by chronic hyperglycemia and disturbance of carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism associated with absolute or relative deficiencies in insulin secretion and/or insulin action(3). Complications of diabetes The longer duration of diabetes the less controlled of blood sugar levels leads to development of diabetic complications which are divided into microvascular ( damage to small blood vessel) and macrovascular (damage to large blood veseels). • Micro vascular complications: These are Long term complications that affect retina, kidney and nervous system(3). Permanent disability is a common outcome of diabetes, with late complications of diabetes being major determinants for disability. Diabetic eye disease particularly retinopathy, has become a major cause of blindness throughout the world. • Macro vascular complications: Type 2 diabetes can also affect the large blood vessels, causing plaque to eventually build up and potentially leading to a heart attack, stroke or vessel blockage in the legs (peripheral vascular disease) Diabetic foot also occur with higher frequency in diabetes(4,5). Keywords: cross sectional study, prevalence of microvascular complications, diabetes ...


Editor-in-chief: 
Dr. Fadi Alkhateeb 
Associate Dean of Academic Affairs and Associate Professor, Ben and Maytee Fisch College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Tyler, 3900 University Blvd, Office # 328, Tyler, TX 75799

Vice Editor-in-Chief:
Dr. Saurabh Gupta 
Professor and Head, Department of Pharmacology, Indore Institute of Pharmacy, Indore (M.P.), India; Principal Co-ordinator Scientist for outsources projects of industry, Indore institute of Pharmacy, Indore (M.P.), India,; Scientist Co-ordinator member of Institutional Animal Ethical Committee, Indore institute of Pharmacy, Indore.

Editors

Dr. Mohammed A. Islam
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Coast University School of Pharmacy, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Dr. Juseop Kang
Department of Pharmacology and Clinical Pharmacology Laboratory, College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791, South Korea.

Dr. Mohamed Azmi Hassali
Professor of Social and Administrative Pharmacy, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang, Malaysia.

Dr. Apollo James
Department of Pharmacy Practice, Nandha college of Pharmacy, Erode, Tamilnadu, India.

Dr. Iftikhar Ali
Department of Pharmacy, Northwest General Hospital and Research Center, Department of Pharmacy, University of Swabi, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa , Pakistan.

Dr Anthony David Hall
School of Clinical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology (QUT), Brisbane, Australia.

Dr Bhanukumar M
Department of General Medicine, JSS Hospital & Medical College, JSS University, Mysore, India.

Dr. Sandeep Kumar Kar
Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education & Research, India.

Dr. Biswaranjan Paital
Department of Zoology, Orissa University of Agriculture and Technology, College of Basic Science and Humanities, Bhubaneswar-751003, Odisha, India.

Dr. Vasiliki E. Kalodimou
Director at Flow Cytometry-Research & Regenerative Medicine Department, Athens, Greece.

Dr. Hale Z. Toklu
Department of Pharmacology & Therapeutics, University of Florida College of Medicine, 32610 Gainesville, FL, USA.

Dr. Fahad Saleem
Discipline of Social and Administrative Pharmacy, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Universiti Sains, Malaysia, Minden 11800, Penang, Malaysia

Dr. Ahamada Safna Mariyam.M
Dept of Pharmacy Practice, Acharya & B.M Reddy College of Pharmacy, Bangalore-107, India.

Dr. Ghada Ismail El Shahat Ali Attia
Literature of Pharmacognosy, Departments of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy, TANTA University- Egypt

Dr. Tauqeer Hussain Mallhi
School Of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Usm, Penang, Malaysia

Dr. Burton M. Altura

Physiology and Pharmacology Department, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, NY, USA.

Dr.  Yousif Abdu Asiri
Vice – Rector for Planning and Development, Professor of Clinical Pharmacy, King Saud University,, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia.

Dr. Amit K. Tiwari
Department of Pharmacology & Experimental Therapeutics, The University of Toledo – Health Science Campus, Toledo, OH, USA.

Dr. Saurabh Gupta
Professor and Head, Department of Pharmacology, Indore Institute of Pharmacy, Indore (M.P.), India, Principal Co-ordinator Scientist for outsources projects of industry, Indore institute of Pharmacy, Indore (M.P.), India, Scientist Co-ordinator member of Institutional Animal Ethical Committee, Indore institute of Pharmacy, Indore.

Dr. Tyler Madere
University of North Texas System College of Pharmacy –Department of Pharmacotherapy, Fort Worth, TX,USA.

Dr. Xianquan Zhan
Professor and Deputy Director, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, P.R. China

Dr. Fatima Suleman
Head of Discipline of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Health Sciences, College of Health Sciences of University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa.

Dr. Mohamed Eddouks
Faculty of Sciences and Techniques Errachidia, Moulay Ismail University, Meknes, Morocco.

Dr.  Syed A. A. Rizvi 
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Health Professions Division, Nova Southeastern University, FL, USA.

Dr. Carmela Saturnino 
Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, SA, ITALY.

Dr. Taha Nazir
University of Sargodha, Sargodha 40100, Pakistan.

Dr. Fadi Alkhateeb
Pharmacy Administration, Department of Pharmacy Practice, Irma Lerma Rangel College of Pharmacy, Texas A&M Health Science Center, Kingsville, Texas, USA.

Dr. Madhan Ramesh
Professor & Head, Department of Pharmacy Practice, JSS College of Pharmacy, JSS University, S S Nagar, Mysore.

Sushanta Kr. Das.
M. Pharm (Pharmacy Practice), Associate Professor and Pharm D Coordinator, CMR College of Pharmacy, Hyderabad

Dr. Mario Bernardo-Filho
Professor Titular, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro

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References: References should be listed in a numbered citation order at the end of the manuscript. DOIs and links to referenced articles should be added if available. Abstracts and talks for conferences or papers not yet accepted should not be cited. Examples Published Papers: 

1.Kim P.G.M. Hurkens, Carlota Mestres-Gonzalvo, Hugo A.J.M. de Wit, Rob Janknegt, Frans Verhey, Jos M.G.A. Schols, Fabienne Magdelijns, Coen D.A. Stehouwer, Bjorn Winkens, Wubbo Mulder and P. Hugo M. van der Kuy. Assessing the strengths and weaknesses of a computer assisted medication review in hospitalized patients. International Journal of Hospital Pharmacy, 2017,2:6. DOI: 10.28933/IJHP-2017-10-0101 
2.Ananth kashyap, Rashmi N G, Rakshith U R, Hanumanthachar Joshi.Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors Induced Serotonin Syndrome –A Case Report. International Journal of Hospital Pharmacy, 2017,2:7. DOI:10.28933/ijhp-2017-10-1101

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International Journal of Hospital Pharmacy is a peer reviewed open access journal publishing research manuscripts, review articles, case reports, editorials, letters to the editor in Hospital Pharmacy (indexing details).

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International Journal of Hospital Pharmacy

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