International Journal of Aging Research


Mitochondrial Metabolism, Dysfunctions in Senescence Cell and the Possible Interventions through Herbal Medicines

Review Article of International Journal of Aging Research Mitochondrial Metabolism, Dysfunctions in Senescence Cell and the Possible Interventions through Herbal Medicines Ferro M.*, Graubard A., Escalante P., Ledezma R., Channan G., Mia N., Dotres V., Bencomo Y., Datri P. FG Scientifica and Science Department at Nutrition Formulators Inc., Miramar, Fl, USA. The mitochondria are the cell`s powerhouse. They are considered ubiquitous organelles of all eukaryotic cells, being responsible for the cell’s life and death cycle. Through stimuli in the environment in which they live, mitochondria can modulate their own biogenesis as well as signal retrograde to the nucleus to modify the structure of their proteins. Since the mitochondrial genome contains only 37 genes, much of the encoding of its proteins depends on the nuclear genome. Thus, the communication between mitochondria and the nucleus seems to be a target of science in understanding the pathologies associated with this organelle. Some medicinal herbs have been shown to influence mitochondrial biogenesis, such as Gynostemma pentaphyllun (GP) and berberine, which increase the phosphorylation of proteins AMPactivated protein kinase (AMPK). Just as GP and berberine phosphorylate AMPK in signaling for mitochondrial biogenesis, the sesquiterpene beta-caryophyllene (BCP) demonstrated positive results in reorganizing mitochondrial transcription factors, being an agonist of the peroxisome proliferatoractivated alpha receptor (PPAR-α). Another plant derivative, the non-psychoactive cannabinoid known as cannabidiol (CBD), has been showing control in the metabolism of calcium in the mitochondrial matrix. In this review, we seek to get a closer look at the biochemical mechanisms of action of some of these plants, as well as their synergies in the results of different treatments. In the view of oriental medicines, the use of associated medicinal herbs has always been part of their treatment protocols. However, the effectiveness of these treatments in relation to plant synergy can be observed in future ...

Predictors of in-hospital mortality in critically ill Geriatric patients

Research Article of International Journal of Aging Research Predictors of in-hospital mortality in critically ill Geriatric patients Khalid E. Elsorady, MD Department of Geriatrics and Gerontology, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt Objective: To determine the predictors of in-hospital mortality in critically ill older patients. Participants and Methods: A prospective cohort study including 305 critically ill older adults (age ≥60 years) who were admitted to High Dependency Units (HDUs) in a tertiary care university hospital from March 22, 2019 to January 4, 2020. Demographic, clinical and laboratory data of participants were collected thought a review of medical records and clinical observation at HDUs till either death or discharge alive. Statistical analysis included univariate analysis of selected potential predictors such as various comorbidities, C- reactive protein / Albumin ratio (CAR), Neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), Red cell distribution width (RDW), Po2/Fio2 ratio (PFR), Simplified acute physiology score II (SAPS II), Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) and multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial (MDR-GNB) infection to ascertain their association with mortality, followed by multivariable logistic regression to derive the final prediction model. The discriminative ability of the model was evaluated by using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. RESULTS: Overall mortality was 53.1%. Multivariate regression analysis revealed independent predictors of mortality including dementia in clinical history with an odds ratio (OR) of 4.86 (95% CI: 1.28-18.34), total protein with an OR of .53 (95% CI: .30-.95) and the use of mechanical ventilation (MV) and/or intravenous cardiovascular support with an OR of 148.34 (95% CI: 34.28-641.77), formulating a novel prognostic model with an area under the ROC curve of .93 (95% CI: .89-.96, P.000). CONCLUSION: History of dementia, total protein and the use of MV and/or intravenous cardiovascular support are predictors of mortality in critically ill geriatric patients. It provides a novel prognostic model which needs validation ...

Development of Estimate Formulas for Waist Circumference Using Body Mass Index and Limb Circumferences in Hospitalized Older Adults

Research Article of International Journal of Aging Research Development of Estimate Formulas for Waist Circumference Using Body Mass Index and Limb Circumferences in Hospitalized Older Adults Daisuke Takagi, PhD1, Masatoshi Kageyama2,3, Kenta Yamamoto4, Hiroshi Matsumoto, MD5 1Department of Physical Therapy, Health Science University; 2Long-Term Care Health Facilities Sunrise Ohama; 3Graduate School, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Cooperative Major in Medical Photonics (Doctoral Course);4Department of Rehabilitation, Toyoda Eisei Hospital; 5Department of Orthopedic surgery, Toyoda Eisei Hospital Background: Little research has been conducted on the estimate formulas for waist circumference using body mass index and limb circumferences in hospitalized older adults. Thus, we conducted the present study to develop estimate formulas of waist circumference using body mass index and limb circumferences in hospitalized older adults. Methods: Forty hospitalized older patients were recruited in this cross-sectional study. We measured waist circumference, body mass index, upper arm circumference, forearm circumference, thigh circumference, and calf circumference. The estimate formulas for waist circumference were developed using simple and multiple regression analysis. Results: Simple regression analysis indicated that body mass index, upper arm circumference, forearm circumference, thigh circumference, and calf circumference were independent explanators for waist circumference (p < 0.05 for all). In addition, body mass index, upper arm circumference, and forearm circumference but not thigh circumference and calf circumference were extracted as independent explanators for waist circumference in multiple regression analysis (p < 0.05). We were able to develop the estimate formulas using body mass index, upper arm circumference, forearm circumference, thigh circumference, and calf circumference. Conclusion: The results suggest that the estimate formulas for waist circumference may provide an opportunity to easily evaluate waist circumference, even in hospitalized older adults with kyphosis posture. However, future studies should be conducted to develop the estimate formulas for waist circumference with a lower error value. Keywords: Estimate formula, ...

Social prescription for those living with dementia; does MedTech have a role to play?

Review Article of International Journal of Aging Research Social prescription for those living with dementia; does MedTech have a role to play? Azam Bazooband1*, Saba Kaviani2 1Master of Business Administration, Payame Nour University of Babol. 2Master of Translation, Shiraz Azad university. Ageing is the major risk factor for dementia and nearly every country has seen its life expectancy rise from the beginning of the 21st century. Remaining socially connected has positive health and social implications and may be even more significant for marginalized group of people like those living with dementia. If appropriately used, social prescriptions can help deliver value-based social engagement and primary care by maximising the utilisation of resources and addressing social determinants of health, decreasing dependency on the biomedical model and thus providing a way for health care systems to deal with social determinants of health. More frequently, however, those seeking access to these programmes do not tend to do so simply due to lack of understanding and knowledge of the availability of such services. So, provision of social activities involves more than developing a program and hoping people will attend, and considering the particular situations of those living with dementia as marginalised group of people, and taking into account that there is no treatment for dementia, societies need to move toward social prescription, integrating appropriate MedTech support- targeting on those living with dementia- into such programs. Keywords: Dementia; Social prescription; MedTech; Social participation; Ageing ...

Dr. Jong In Kim
Professor and Chairman, Institute for Longevity Sciences, Wonkwang University, South Korea

Dr. Emmanuel ANDRES
Professor of Internal Medicine; Head of the Department of Internal Medicine, Internal Medicine in the University hospital of Strasbourg, University of Strasbourg, France

Dr. Karen V. Harper-Dorton
Professor, School of Social Work, West Virginia University, West Virginia 26506

Dr. Ferhan SOYUER
Professor, Nuh Naci Yazgan University Faculty of Health Sciences, Kayseri/Turkey

Dr. Akira Sugawara
Professor, Department of Molecular Endocrinology,Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Miyagi, Japan

Dr. Francisco López-Muñoz

Professor of Pharmacology, Director of International Doctorate School, Chairman of the Research Ethics Committee, and Assistant Director of Academic Staff at Camilo José Cela University, and Research Fellow at “Hospital 12 de Octubre” Research Institute (Madrid, Spain), and Portucalense Institute of Neuropsychology and Cognitive and Behavioral Neurosciences (INPP), Universidade Portucalense Infante Dom Henrique 

Dr. Diego Lacono
Associate Professor, Biomedical Sciences, Biomedical Research Institute of New Jersey, NJ 07927

Dr. Ya-Lie Ku
Associate Professor, College of Nursing, Department of Nursing, Fooyin University

Dr. Dorina Lauritano
Assistant Professor, Faculty of Medicine – University of Milano”Bicocca”, Monza

Dr. Naohiro Hohashi
Professor, Division of Family Health Care Nursing, Department of Nursing, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Kobe University

Dr. Bechor Zvi Aminoff
Professor, Geriatric Division, The Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel

Dr. Lia Ginaldi
Full Professor, Department of Clinical Medicine, Public Health, Life and Environment Sciences University of L’Aquila

Dr. Ufuk Çakatay
Professor, Department of Medical Biochemistry, Cerrahpaşa Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey

Dr. Fabio Monzani
Professor, Department of Clinical & Experimental Medicine, Section of Geriatrics and Gerontology, University Hospital of Pisa, Italy

Dr. Robert L. Clegg
Professor/Faculty Head, Health Administration Programs

Dr. Ian Martins
Centre of Excellence for Alzheimer’s Disease Research and Care Sarich Neuroscience Research Institute, Edith Cowan University, Australia

Dr. Kim L. Stansbury
Associate Professor/Director of MSW Program, Department of Social Work, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina

Dr. Putilov, Arcady A.
Chief researcher, Research Institute for Molecular Biology and Biophysics, Novosibirsk, Russia

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1. Avinaba Mukherjee, Sourav Sikdar, Anisur Rahman Khuda-Bukhsh. Evaluation of ameliorative potential of isolated flavonol fractions from Thuja occidentalis in lung cancer cells and in Benzo(a) pyrene induced lung toxicity in mice. International Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine, 2016; 1(1): 0001-0013. 
2. Vikas Gupta, Parveen Bansal, Junaid Niazi, Kamlesh Kohli, Pankaj Ghaiye. Anti-anxiety Activity of Citrus paradisi var. duncan Extracts in Swiss Albino Mice-A Preclinical Study. Journal of Herbal Medicine Research, 2016; 1(1): 0001-0006.

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