International Journal of Aging Research


COGNITIVE PROFILE IN ELDERLY WITH MEMORY CHANGE COMPLAINTS

Research Article of International Journal of Aging Research COGNITIVE PROFILE IN ELDERLY WITH MEMORY CHANGE COMPLAINTS João Carlos Alchieri1, Leopoldo Nelson Fernandes Barbosa2, Mônica Cristina Batista de Melo3, Maria Athina Kotzias-Bandeira4* Introduction: Population aging has increased over the years and directly affecting the health system. Latin America is considered to be a region where good information about dementia is lacking. Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the cognitive profile of the elderly with complaints of memory impairment. Method: The study was performed with patients who were being followed up at a public hospital in Recife - PE. Data were collected through the CERAD neuropsychological battery. Results and Discussion: 42 elderly people were evaluated in the first half of 2018, of which 13 were men and 29 were women with a mean age of 74.12 years. The majority, 74.36%, did not present scores compatible with GDS depression and MMSE was normal in 69.05% of the elderly; 66.67% presented alterations in the design of the clock and the majority presented alterations in the evocations of immediate and late words and also in the recognition of words. The CDR scores for 34.15% were compatible with mild dementia and moderate dementia classified 24.39% by CDR. Conclusions: Measures to diagnose the cognitive profile in the elderly are fundamental for the elderly to have a good quality of life and qualified treatment from health professionals. Keywords: Eldery, Cognitive Profile, Executive Functions, Evaluation, Neuropsychological ...

Benefits of Digital Gameplay for Older Adults: Does Game Type Make a Difference?

Research Article of International Journal of Aging Research Benefits of Digital Gameplay for Older Adults: Does Game Type Make a Difference? David Kaufman1, Mengxin Ma2, Louise Sauvé3, Lise Renaud4, Emmanuel Dupláa5 1Faculty of Education, Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, BC, Canada V5A 1S6;2Faculty of Education, Simon Fraser University, 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, BC, Canada V5A 1S6;3Département Éducation, Université TELUQ, 455 rue du Parvis, Quebec, QC Canada G1K 9H6;4Département de communication sociale et publique,Université du Québec à Montréal, 405, rue Sainte-Catherine Est, J-3190, Montréal, QC Canada H2L 2C4;5Faculty of Education, University of Ottawa,  45, Jean-Jacques-Lussies Private, Room 143,Ottawa, ON, Canada K1N 6N5. Digital games can help older adults to entertain themselves, socialize with others, engage their cognitive functions, and enhance emotional states. This study surveyed 463 older Canadian adults to identify the digital games they had played and investigate whether playing them was associated with perceived socioemotional and cognitive benefits. The most widely reported socioemotional benefits were developing self-confidence, dealing with loneliness, and connecting with family. The most widely reported cognitive benefits were focusing, memory improvement, improved reaction speed, and problem solving. In the socioemotional category, connecting with current friends and connecting with family were both associated with strategy games, while connecting with current friends was also associated with sport games. In the cognitive category, both problem solving and speed in reacting/responding were associated with arcade games. Results show that playing digital games has the potential to be an intervention tool to improve older adults’ wellbeing. Funding: This study was supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (grant number 435-2012-0325) and AGE-WELL NCE Inc., a member of Canada’s Networks of Centres of Excellence (grant number CRP 2015-WP4.2). Keywords: digital games, game type, older adults, socioemotional benefits, cognitive benefits ...

Anthropometric Parameters for Height Estimation in Egyptian Elderly Males

Research Article of International Journal of Aging Research Anthropometric Parameters for Height Estimation in Egyptian Elderly Males Hala Samir Sweed1, Maram Maher Monier1, Nahla Fawzi Abu-ElEzz2, Ahmed A Abdelgaleel1 1Geriatrics and Gerontology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo. Egypt; 2Community Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo. Egypt Background: Aging as a natural physiological process is accompanied with nutritional and metabolic changes that is reflected by the anthropometric indices furthermore loss of muscular and fat masses rises. elderly individuals it is complex, and sometimes impossible, to measure standing height precisely because of standing straight difficulties arising from underlying mobility issues Anthropometric indices and measuring formulas are greatly trustworthy when compared with more sophisticated methodologies such as hydro densitometry, electronic bio impedance. Aim: To assess which one of the three anthropometric measures (demi-span, ulna length and knee height) is the most accurate for height estimation in Egyptian elderly males, and to provide a nationally representative regression equation for stature prediction that could be applied to Egyptian elderly males. Methodology: A cross sectional research study was conducted to estimate height in community dwelling Egyptian ambulant elderly males. The study sample consisted of 226 community dwelling elderly males. Results: The model for using knee height to estimate standing height of Egyptian elderly males [Height = 57.345 + 2.131 (Knee height in cm)], was found to be statistically significant reflecting 63.3% of standing height changes. [Table (5)] Besides there was strong statistically significant positive correlation between measured standing heights and study predicted standing heights (P value < 0.001). [Table (6)] Finally it was revealed and displayed that by using the study equation, there is no statistically significant difference between measured and predicted heights. Conclusions: In the current research study, knee height was found to be more accurate than demi-span and ...

A Study of the Attitudes of Nigerian Civil Servants towards Ageing

Research Article of International Journal of Aging Research A Study of the Attitudes of Nigerian Civil Servants towards Ageing Grace M. Nwasogwa1, Kelechi T. Ugwu2 1Department of Language Studies, Institute of Management and Technology (IMT) Enugu, Nigeria 2Department of Social Sciences and Humanities, Institute of Management and Technology (IMT) Enugu, Nigeria The human population is continuously ageing and previous studies suggest that one’s attitude towards ageing predicts ageing outcome. While several factors have been shown to influence attitude towards ageing, the current study investigated the influence of self-esteem and gender on attitude towards ageing. The study adopted a cross sectional design and a total of two hundred and five (205) civil servants were randomly selected from state Civil Service Secretariats and Local Government headquarters in Enugu, Anambra and Ebonyi states respectively. Self-report measures including the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and a Self-Developed Attitude towards Ageing Scale were used for data collection. A Two-Way Analysis of Variance was used for the data analysis. The findings revealed that our first proposition that self-esteem as a psychological mechanism will significantly predict attitude towards ageing was not supported meaning that self-esteem whether high or low does not matter in how individuals respond to ageing consciousness. Whereas, the second proposition that gender will greatly influence attitude towards ageing was confirmed. In other word, the result further confirmed that female show more positive attitude about ageing than the male. The findings are discussed. Keywords: Attitude, Ageing, Civil Servants, Self-Esteem, Gender ...

Dr. Jong In Kim
Professor and Chairman, Institute for Longevity Sciences, Wonkwang University, South Korea

Dr. Emmanuel ANDRES
Professor of Internal Medicine; Head of the Department of Internal Medicine, Internal Medicine in the University hospital of Strasbourg, University of Strasbourg, France

Dr. Karen V. Harper-Dorton
Professor, School of Social Work, West Virginia University, West Virginia 26506

Dr. Ferhan SOYUER
Professor, Nuh Naci Yazgan University Faculty of Health Sciences, Kayseri/Turkey

Dr. Akira Sugawara
Professor, Department of Molecular Endocrinology,Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Miyagi, Japan

Dr. Francisco López-Muñoz

Professor of Pharmacology, Director of International Doctorate School, Chairman of the Research Ethics Committee, and Assistant Director of Academic Staff at Camilo José Cela University, and Research Fellow at “Hospital 12 de Octubre” Research Institute (Madrid, Spain), and Portucalense Institute of Neuropsychology and Cognitive and Behavioral Neurosciences (INPP), Universidade Portucalense Infante Dom Henrique 

Dr. Diego Lacono
Associate Professor, Biomedical Sciences, Biomedical Research Institute of New Jersey, NJ 07927

Dr. Ya-Lie Ku
Associate Professor, College of Nursing, Department of Nursing, Fooyin University

Dr. Dorina Lauritano
Assistant Professor, Faculty of Medicine – University of Milano”Bicocca”, Monza

Dr. Naohiro Hohashi
Professor, Division of Family Health Care Nursing, Department of Nursing, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Kobe University

Dr. Bechor Zvi Aminoff
Professor, Geriatric Division, The Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel

Dr. Lia Ginaldi
Full Professor, Department of Clinical Medicine, Public Health, Life and Environment Sciences University of L’Aquila

Dr. Ufuk Çakatay
Professor, Department of Medical Biochemistry, Cerrahpaşa Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey

Dr. Fabio Monzani
Professor, Department of Clinical & Experimental Medicine, Section of Geriatrics and Gerontology, University Hospital of Pisa, Italy

Dr. Robert L. Clegg
Professor/Faculty Head, Health Administration Programs

Dr. Ian Martins
Centre of Excellence for Alzheimer’s Disease Research and Care Sarich Neuroscience Research Institute, Edith Cowan University, Australia

Dr. Kim L. Stansbury
Associate Professor/Director of MSW Program, Department of Social Work, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina

Dr. Putilov, Arcady A.
Chief researcher, Research Institute for Molecular Biology and Biophysics, Novosibirsk, Russia

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International Journal of Aging Research is a peer reviewed open access journal publishing research manuscripts, review articles, editorials, letters to the editor in Aging Research (Indexing details).

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