International Journal of Aging Research


Sharing Stories as Legacy: What Matters to Older Adults?

Research Article of International Journal of Aging Research Sharing Stories as Legacy: What Matters to Older Adults? Neha Shivhare, Ph.D.1, Luciane Maria Fadel, Ph.D.2, David Kaufman, Ed.D.3 1Dayalbagh Educational Inst. (Deemed University), Agra, India. 2Federal University of Santa Catarina, Brazil. 3Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, Canada. Objectives: Legacy allows individuals to make meaning of their lives by passing on their experiences and beliefs to younger people and influencing their perspectives, perceptions, and actions. This mixed-methods study investigated: (1) What is important for older adults to share as legacy with families, friends and others, based on the types and features of their digital stories ? and (2) How do older adults’ digital stories affect story viewers? Methods: One hundred adults aged between 55 and 95 years participated in ten-week Elder’s Digital Storytelling courses and created short digital stories. Using the content analysis approach, the story transcripts were thematically analyzed and iteratively coded by three researchers and the results were quantified. A diverse group of 60 viewers at a public event provided their reactions to the digital stories. Results: The findings revealed that character, place, and family were chosen as the primary types by the older adults for their legacy digital stories. Accomplishment and career/school were the next most prominent story types. Moreover, these digital stories appeared to have a powerful impact on the viewers. Discussion: A digital story is a powerful artifact to communicate an older person’s legacy because it is based on familiar forms of communication, such as speech and photographs. The major legacy themes chosen by the older adults align with the findings of the research literature. The feedback from the viewers of the digital stories reflects these as a source of life wisdom and legacy for younger generations. Funding details: This work was supported by the AGE-WELL National Centre ...

Older Adult Perspectives towards Health Literacy and Knowledge of Chronic Diseases in Nepal: A case study

Review Article of International Journal of Aging Research Older Adult Perspectives towards Health Literacy and Knowledge of Chronic Diseases in Nepal: A case study Binod Kumar Karki, Krishna Prasad Pathak Faculty of Health Education, Koteshwor Multiple Campus, Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu, Nepal. Background: The individual level of health literacy directly affects the health outcomes of any people. Older adult people are more vulnerable to chronic diseases than other groups of people. Also they have low health literacy and poor understanding of diseases than any other age group of people. Aim: This study aim is to explore older adult perspectives towards health literacy and knowledge of chronic diseases. Methods: The study was taken during December 2019 in the Budhanilkantha Municipality of Kathmandu district of Nepal. Semi-structured interview was conducted in four older adult participants with chronic diseases. It included health knowledge, level of understanding of chronic disease conditions, and the use of health services. Inductive analysis was followed for the patterns, themes, and categories of analysis to emerge. Results: Health literacy and knowledge of chronic diseases, health belief system, and experience of health problems were the emerging themes included here. The study results finds that lack of disease knowledge, low health literacy, health belief system, socio-economic, and cultural factors were influencing factors to chronic diseases among older adults. Participants had a minor knowledge of chronic diseases; they had lack in knowledge regarding their own chronic diseases. Conclusion: Health literacy is an important factor of understanding, accessing and utilizing health knowledge and health services. It is most important that the health literacy of the people is necessary to improve for positive health and gaining the knowledge of chronic diseases. To overcome the chronic health problems it is most important to improve the health knowledge, understanding of chronic diseases, and literacy level to the ...

Psychosocial support for families of persons with dementia through home based care programme from a developing country: Process of intervention development and pilot testing

Research Article of International Journal of Aging Research Psychosocial support for families of persons with dementia through home based care programme from a developing country: Process of intervention development and pilot testing Sherin Yohannan, Aravind Raj.E, A.Tirumoorthy Department of Psychiatric Social Work, Dr.M.V.Govindaswamy center, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS), Bangalore-560029, Karnataka, India. In India, person with dementia continue to live with their families all through their illness period. It is common in India that because of the family relationships and cultural values the caregiving process is a joint effort made by the adult members in the family. Thus understanding the psychosocial issues of the caregivers of persons with dementia in the Indian context and providing appropriate psychosocial support for the caregivers is essential in the holistic approach for the care for persons with dementia.The current paper shares the process of development of psychosocial intervention for the families of persons with dementia and findings from the pilot study in urban Bangalore. The findings were helpful in systematically developing the content for the proposed homebased care programme for caregivers of persons with dementia. The pilot results show that the psychosocial support through home based programme for the family caregivers of persons with dementia is feasible and effective. Keywords: Psychosocial support, dementia ...

Alzheimer’s Disease & Dementia-From Pathophysiology To Clinic

Review Article of International Journal of Aging Research Alzheimer's Disease & Dementia-From Pathophysiology To Clinic Paulo Roberto de Brito Marques* *Professor Doctor, Director of the Discipline of Neurology, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas (FCM), University of Pernambuco (UPE). Preceptor of the Neurology Residency at the Universitary Hospital Oswaldo Cruz of FCM-UPE. Coordinator of the Center for Studies in Neurology of the Behavior of the Neurology Discipline at FCM-UPE. Member of the Alzheimer \Parkinson Committee for Technical-Scientific Advice and Honorary Provision - of the Pharmaceutical Assistance Management of the Pernambuco State Health Department. Dementia is a syndrome that occurs due to the difficulty of a patient in doing his cognitive and instrumental activities of daily life with the same performance as before, bringing him losses. This syndrome is caused by numerous primary and secondary etiologies. The most common primary cause of dementia is Alzheimer’s disease (AD), which reaches almost 50% of dementia cases. The DA it consists of biological fragments of the amyloid precursor protein that are deposited in the brain 10 years or more, before the first symptoms appear. The period before the onset of symptoms is called the preclinical stage. The transition between the silence of symptoms and their appearance, usually due to memory loss for recent events, is known as the prodromal phase. Continuing the pathophysiological process, the stage of mild dementia takes place, when the patient has one more cognitive component associated with memory loss; follows the moderate, severe, profound and terminal phase of dementia. Keywords: Alzheimer’s Disease,Dementia, Pathophysiology, Clinic ...

Dr. Jong In Kim
Professor and Chairman, Institute for Longevity Sciences, Wonkwang University, South Korea

Dr. Emmanuel ANDRES
Professor of Internal Medicine; Head of the Department of Internal Medicine, Internal Medicine in the University hospital of Strasbourg, University of Strasbourg, France

Dr. Karen V. Harper-Dorton
Professor, School of Social Work, West Virginia University, West Virginia 26506

Dr. Ferhan SOYUER
Professor, Nuh Naci Yazgan University Faculty of Health Sciences, Kayseri/Turkey

Dr. Akira Sugawara
Professor, Department of Molecular Endocrinology,Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Miyagi, Japan

Dr. Francisco López-Muñoz

Professor of Pharmacology, Director of International Doctorate School, Chairman of the Research Ethics Committee, and Assistant Director of Academic Staff at Camilo José Cela University, and Research Fellow at “Hospital 12 de Octubre” Research Institute (Madrid, Spain), and Portucalense Institute of Neuropsychology and Cognitive and Behavioral Neurosciences (INPP), Universidade Portucalense Infante Dom Henrique 

Dr. Diego Lacono
Associate Professor, Biomedical Sciences, Biomedical Research Institute of New Jersey, NJ 07927

Dr. Ya-Lie Ku
Associate Professor, College of Nursing, Department of Nursing, Fooyin University

Dr. Dorina Lauritano
Assistant Professor, Faculty of Medicine – University of Milano”Bicocca”, Monza

Dr. Naohiro Hohashi
Professor, Division of Family Health Care Nursing, Department of Nursing, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Kobe University

Dr. Bechor Zvi Aminoff
Professor, Geriatric Division, The Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel

Dr. Lia Ginaldi
Full Professor, Department of Clinical Medicine, Public Health, Life and Environment Sciences University of L’Aquila

Dr. Ufuk Çakatay
Professor, Department of Medical Biochemistry, Cerrahpaşa Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey

Dr. Fabio Monzani
Professor, Department of Clinical & Experimental Medicine, Section of Geriatrics and Gerontology, University Hospital of Pisa, Italy

Dr. Robert L. Clegg
Professor/Faculty Head, Health Administration Programs

Dr. Ian Martins
Centre of Excellence for Alzheimer’s Disease Research and Care Sarich Neuroscience Research Institute, Edith Cowan University, Australia

Dr. Kim L. Stansbury
Associate Professor/Director of MSW Program, Department of Social Work, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina

Dr. Putilov, Arcady A.
Chief researcher, Research Institute for Molecular Biology and Biophysics, Novosibirsk, Russia

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1. Avinaba Mukherjee, Sourav Sikdar, Anisur Rahman Khuda-Bukhsh. Evaluation of ameliorative potential of isolated flavonol fractions from Thuja occidentalis in lung cancer cells and in Benzo(a) pyrene induced lung toxicity in mice. International Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine, 2016; 1(1): 0001-0013. 
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